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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)

A 100-kWh battery delivering 300-miles of range on a full charge is coming to the Mach E SUV.

That is if current estimates, based off the confirmed +300-miles of range and prioritized performance, are correct. 100-kWh is considered large for an electric SUV expected to be priced from around $40,000. It’s a size found in the $80,000 Tesla Model S Long Range.

Charging will involve a number of solutions. Ford is said to be preparing mobile charging stations (public and destination charging) and inductive charging among “many possibilities.” It isn’t clear what will be available when the Mach E SUV arrives around fall 2020 but a partnership with Electrify America is being formed right now. As it happens expect to see stations show up on the MyFord Mobile app.


Charge times could be as little as an hour going from low to 80% at DC fast charging stations, overnight when using the available 240v high-power charger and even longer when with the 120v standard home outlet charger. A production model reveal later this year could provide insight on charge times. For now, Ford provided a useful tool to see how far the Mach E's range can take you with locations of charging stations along the route you pick.

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There's been a bunch of info that's been out about the Mustang Mach-E's charging.

Here's some home charging information.




You can get 47 miles of range in 10 minutes with a 150 kW DC Fast Charger.


 

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"You can get 47 miles of range in 10 minutes with a 150 kW DC Fast Charger. " This does not add up. If you get 300 miles on 100kwh battery, 150 kW for 10 minutes gives you 25 kWh and should be good for 75 miles. I think the add says estimated average DC fast charge. So they assume you will get 15.66 kWh in 10 minutes or 96 kW charging rate, not 150.
Maybe they are truthful and acknowledge that nobody gets the full capacity of a DC fast charge for the duration of the charge.
 

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My Harley Davidson Livewire comes with a total of 500kWh of free charging for the first two years of ownership from EA. That's about 38 full charges. I also get two years of free charging from Harley Davidson Livewire dealers with no limits. HD dealers have the ChargePoint network. Hope Ford gives us free charging.
 

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"You can get 47 miles of range in 10 minutes with a 150 kW DC Fast Charger. " This does not add up. If you get 300 miles on 100kwh battery, 150 kW for 10 minutes gives you 25 kWh and should be good for 75 miles. I think the add says estimated average DC fast charge. So they assume you will get 15.66 kWh in 10 minutes or 96 kW charging rate, not 150.
Maybe they are truthful and acknowledge that nobody gets the full capacity of a DC fast charge for the duration of the charge.
Your calculations assume the battery charges continuously at the maximum rate. Most high capacity batteries have charging curves that show the charging rate declines as the battery charges. This is why we all want to see the charging curves the engineers have generated from their testing.
 

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Yes, I understand the charging curve. It is more valuable than "can charge up to 150 kW". If you are on a long trip, multiple fast charges that do not get the battery to 80% may be preferable. I have a friend with a Tesla Model S. On trips south, he said the navigation direct him to do more partial charges, resulting in an overall shorter trip.
 

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"You can get 47 miles of range in 10 minutes with a 150 kW DC Fast Charger. " This does not add up. If you get 300 miles on 100kwh battery, 150 kW for 10 minutes gives you 25 kWh and should be good for 75 miles. I think the add says estimated average DC fast charge. So they assume you will get 15.66 kWh in 10 minutes or 96 kW charging rate, not 150.
Maybe they are truthful and acknowledge that nobody gets the full capacity of a DC fast charge for the duration of the charge.
As @ChasingCoral said the 47mi/10 minutes appears to be an average of a charging session from 10%-80%, which is very much nonlinear. We don't know the exact characteristics of the Mach E DC fast charging, but "typically" EV batteries can take as long to go from 80% to 100% as they do to go from 10%-80%. We could expect at a low state of charge (say 15%) the battery would draw the full power it is rated for, but then the draw would start to drop quickly as the battery gets more of a charge (starting somewhere around the 30% mark).
 

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This is the curve for a Tesla Model 3:
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Note that it got 81 miles in the first 10 minutes. 127 milwa in 15 minutes. I hope Ford will publish a similar chart got the Mach-e.
 
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