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i do wonder if Ford will give us more of the battery and motor via OTA as they get more real-world data.
Many reviews feel the Mme is artificially restrained. Fingers crossed.
 

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i do wonder if Ford will give us more of the battery and motor via OTA as they get more real-world data.
Many reviews feel the Mme is artificially restrained. Fingers crossed.
From every article I have read, the MME is starting out very conservatively leaving for OTA upgrades in range. They may be able to "tweak" performance but in reality for 99.9% of the time there is no difference in 0-60 of 4.1 secs, Model Y and 4.8 sec. in the MME.

What most of us crave is longer range to alleviate range anxiety and a more robust charging infrastructure to better be able to use the MME on trips.
 

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i do wonder if Ford will give us more of the battery and motor via OTA as they get more real-world data.
Many reviews feel the Mme is artificially restrained. Fingers crossed.
My "gut" tells me Ford is playing a 'numbers game' and they are intentionally keeping things on the competitive but conservative side. Tesla has over time tweaked via OTAs braking distance, range, and I believe 0-60 times. If Ford put everything up front then there's no media hype if or when Ford improves the numbers over the next year or so. Time will tell.
 

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From every article I have read, the MME is starting out very conservatively leaving for OTA upgrades in range. They may be able to "tweak" performance but in reality for 99.9% of the time there is no difference in 0-60 of 4.1 secs, Model Y and 4.8 sec. in the MME.

What most of us crave is longer range to alleviate range anxiety and a more robust charging infrastructure to better be able to use the MME on trips.
The more I consider, the more I think waiting for the solid state battery may be smart thing to do. Unfortunately I am not patient person and the older I get the more I waiting for things, for what should be obvious reasons. I wonder if it would be stupid to consider and AWD with the standard battery, save $5k, some weight but give up 60 miles of range. I don't need the range but it may hurt resale even more tech improvements.
 

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From every article I have read, the MME is starting out very conservatively leaving for OTA upgrades in range. They may be able to "tweak" performance but in reality for 99.9% of the time there is no difference in 0-60 of 4.1 secs, Model Y and 4.8 sec. in the MME.

What most of us crave is longer range to alleviate range anxiety and a more robust charging infrastructure to better be able to use the MME on trips.
I agree with the range being more important.

Reading the Model Y test article, the first test came in at 4.6. I assume the recent 4.1 test included the $2,000 Model Y acceleration option (0.5 speed improvement) Range increases have always been free.

I would hope Ford also gives range increases free. I don’t think I would buy a speed increase at the moment.
 

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The more I consider, the more I think waiting for the solid state battery may be smart thing to do. Unfortunately I am not patient person and the older I get the more I waiting for things, for what should be obvious reasons. I wonder if it would be stupid to consider and AWD with the standard battery, save $5k, some weight but give up 60 miles of range. I don't need the range but it may hurt resale even more tech improvements.
Not knowing your circumstances it's a tough call. For me I went with RWD and the ER because out West range is important but in most driving situations AWD while nice isn't necessarily a critical factor. Given that most surveys show that "Range Anxiety" is the number one issue keeping many buyers out of EVs, if you're not in a a large Metro area where most people commute short distances then the SR batteries could be a resale issue but then again if the savings are up front and you keep it for years it's a savings now.
 

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I drive very few miles per year, something on the order of 4,000 so range for me is a non issue. I do however like a little more torque for 0-60 speed but even that has diminishing returns. I doubt if I could tell the difference between 5.8 and 5.2 seconds. I live in SW Florida so I don't need AWD for winter conditions. I think I will just give it a rest until I can touch and drive the car.
 

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I drive very few miles per year, something on the order of 4,000 so range for me is a non issue. I do however like a little more torque for 0-60 speed but even that has diminishing returns. I doubt if I could tell the difference between 5.8 and 5.2 seconds. I live in SW Florida so I don't need AWD for winter conditions. I think I will just give it a rest until I can touch and drive the car.
Haven't driven one yet but I sat in a Premium RWD/ER yesterday see my thread MACH E TOUR in LAS VEGAS. I absolutely loved the vehicle.
 

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The more I consider, the more I think waiting for the solid state battery may be smart thing to do. Unfortunately I am not patient person and the older I get the more I waiting for things, for what should be obvious reasons. I wonder if it would be stupid to consider and AWD with the standard battery, save $5k, some weight but give up 60 miles of range. I don't need the range but it may hurt resale even more tech improvements.
Not knowing your circumstances it's a tough call. For me I went with RWD and the ER because out West range is important but in most driving situations AWD while nice isn't necessarily a critical factor. Given that most surveys show that "Range Anxiety" is the number one issue keeping many buyers out of EVs, if you're not in a a large Metro area where most people commute short distances then the SR batteries could be a resale issue but then again if the savings are up front and you keep it for years it's a savings now.
This the reason I will not buy only lease. I just "double checked" the finance calculator for the Option Plan on a Premium SR RWD and for 3 years the residual is 43% and for 4 years 36%. That is anticipated depreciation of 57% and 64% respectively.

Wow! If accurate that is shocking.
 

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This the reason I will not buy only lease. I just "double checked" the finance calculator for the Option Plan on a Premium SR RWD and for 3 years the residual is 43% and for 4 years 36%. That is anticipated depreciation of 57% and 64% respectively.

Wow! If accurate that is shocking.
When I spoke with a salesperson at the Mach E tour he had no idea that the Option Plan wasn't available in Nevada (not certain he knew what the option plan is) and when I told him that I had leased the Fusion then bought it at the end of the term he said "I never buy, always lease then buy" The issues for me will be does Ford Credit 'wrap in' the $7500 and the finance rate on a Red Carpet. If the residual is 'low' then assuming that I still am happy with the Mach E it means the buy out amount will be smaller than a vehicle with a large residual. However, on a trade-in that means the trade-in value will be considerably lower. At this point it's still an open question for me but either way I'm buying or leasing the Mach E.
 

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When I spoke with a salesperson at the Mach E tour he had no idea that the Option Plan wasn't available in Nevada (not certain he knew what the option plan is) and when I told him that I had leased the Fusion then bought it at the end of the term he said "I never buy, always lease then buy" The issues for me will be does Ford Credit 'wrap in' the $7500 and the finance rate on a Red Carpet. If the residual is 'low' then assuming that I still am happy with the Mach E it means the buy out amount will be smaller than a vehicle with a large residual. However, on a trade-in that means the trade-in value will be considerably lower. At this point it's still an open question for me but either way I'm buying or leasing the Mach E.
Without a doubt, if you are happy with a car, and might consider buying it at the end, the lower the residual the better.

On the other hand, if you are not happy, or in more likelihood, there will be much better options out there in three years, so that you do not want to buy the car at the end of the lease, having a low residual means you have paid for depreciation you have not used.

As to trade in, if the residual is low, you may have "equity" in the car. That is very, very rare as almost all leases are supported including the residual, which means that the residual is higher than the actual value of the car at the end of the lease. Then there is also the issue of sales tax. States treat this differently, but in NY I would have to buy the car, pay sales tax, and then trade it in. My gut tells me that the sales tax will wind up eating most of my equity in the car - or that the amount of equity left is so small as not to bother.
 

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Without a doubt, if you are happy with a car, and might consider buying it at the end, the lower the residual the better.

On the other hand, if you are not happy, or in more likelihood, there will be much better options out there in three years, so that you do not want to buy the car at the end of the lease, having a low residual means you have paid for depreciation you have not used.

As to trade in, if the residual is low, you may have "equity" in the car. That is very, very rare as almost all leases are supported including the residual, which means that the residual is higher than the actual value of the car at the end of the lease. Then there is also the issue of sales tax. States treat this differently, but in NY I would have to buy the car, pay sales tax, and then trade it in. My gut tells me that the sales tax will wind up eating most of my equity in the car - or that the amount of equity left is so small as not to bother.
In Nevada if you trade in you get the "unused" portion of the sales tax on the trade rebated
 

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In Nevada if you trade in you get the "unused" portion of the sales tax on the trade rebated
Does that mean can apply directly the equity (if any) as a down payment on a new car without having to buy it at the end of the lease?

BTW, in New York, any down payment on a lease is subject to sales tax. The only exception is if you trade in your car. The trade in value is not subject to sales tax.

In your scenario, in New York, as you are not trading in car, but using the equity in the car at lease end as a down payment, that equity amount would be subject to sales tax.
 

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Does that mean can apply directly the equity (if any) as a down payment on a new car without having to buy it at the end of the lease?

BTW, in New York, any down payment on a lease is subject to sales tax. The only exception is if you trade in your car. The trade in value is not subject to sales tax.

In your scenario, in New York, as you are not trading in car, but using the equity in the car at lease end as a down payment, that equity amount would be subject to sales tax.
The tax rebate would offset/reduce the sales tax paid on the 'Down' but if no down was required then it would be applied to the tax paid on the monthly payments
 

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The tax rebate would offset/reduce the sales tax paid on the 'Down' but if no down was required then it would be applied to the tax paid on the monthly payments
Good.

Different here in NY: Only the trade in value is not subject to tax.

Little known fact: If you wrap the sales tax into the lease payment, which I highly recommend everyone do, then you are in fact borrowing the tax: the dealer pays the sales tax due at lease inception.

So not only do you pay interest on the amount you borrowed, the sales tax, but also tax on that amount!

This was explained to me many years ago: What I did was take the monthly payment, times the number of months, apply the sales tax, took that number, divided by the number of months, and put that number into the lease.

My monthly payment always came out low. The owner explained to me, that the tax as it is now in the lease is also subject to NY state sales tax.

As I said each state treats sales tax differently.
 

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This the reason I will not buy only lease. I just "double checked" the finance calculator for the Option Plan on a Premium SR RWD and for 3 years the residual is 43% and for 4 years 36%. That is anticipated depreciation of 57% and 64% respectively.

Wow! If accurate that is shocking.
Please don’t take this in a negative way, but you are incorrect when you use the balloon payment to calculate residual value.

As you know, the balloon payment is not a residual value in the traditional lease sense, but the balance of your financing loan. Its not an apples-to-apples comparison. You can only compare the cost of traditional financing versus the options plan.

When financing with the Ford Options plan:

If you trade-in your car, you will get book value, minus any monies owed, as down payment to your new vehicle (sales tax reduction will apply). This is no different than if you have traditional financing with a balance at trade in. You can trade to Ford or any other manufacturer since the car belongs to you.

If you keep the vehicle, you have to seek favorable refinancing, or pay off the lump sum balloon payment.

If you surrender the car to Ford without rolling over to a new car, they are basically not penalizing you for not paying off the loan by giving you an ‘out’ clause.

If lease terms are offered, then you can use those values in a true comparison against the competition.

As of today, there is still no lease on the MMe offered by Ford in our area. It may be a non-starter for you by your FE delivery date. I hope Ford comes around to leasing soon.
 

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Please don’t take this in a negative way, but you are incorrect when you use the balloon payment to calculate residual value.

As you know, the balloon payment is not a residual value in the traditional lease sense, but the balance of your financing loan. Its not an apples-to-apples comparison. You can only compare the cost of traditional financing versus the options plan.

When financing with the Ford Options plan:

If you trade-in your car, you will get book value, minus any monies owed, as down payment to your new vehicle (sales tax reduction will apply). This is no different than if you have traditional financing with a balance at trade in. You can trade to Ford or any other manufacturer since the car belongs to you.

If you keep the vehicle, you have to seek favorable refinancing, or pay off the lump sum balloon payment.

If you surrender the car to Ford without rolling over to a new car, they are basically not penalizing you for not paying off the loan by giving you an ‘out’ clause.

If lease terms are offered, then you can use those values in a true comparison against the competition.

As of today, there is still no lease on the MMe offered by Ford in our area. It may be a non-starter for you by your FE delivery date. I hope Ford comes around to leasing soon.
You point is well taken: The Ford Option Plan should only be compared to other financing plans. I agree with you 100%.

The problem is that when you go back months ago, when Ford announced the Option Plan, it was presented by Ford as a "lease alternative" so that the buyer would receive the Federal Tax credit.

I think everyone now realizes that this presentation by Ford was completely bogus: if Ford wanted the lessee (buyer) to have the Federal tax credit of $7,500, Ford could do what most every other manufacturer does and include in the lease, as a cap cost reduction, the Federal Tax credit.

From the posts on this Board and macheclub.com, Ford is now saying that if you want a true lease, the residual will be about 57%, 3 years, 10K miles per year, with an interest rate of about 5.4%. While the residual is reasonable, the interest rate is not.

Hopefully, by the time my FE arrives in mid-January, the interest rates will reflect the present interest rate environment and the Federal tax credit of $7,500 will be included as a cap cost reduction.

Without a decrease in the interest rates and a cap cost reduction, the lease rates for the MME are not competitive.
 

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I agree with the range being more important.

Reading the Model Y test article, the first test came in at 4.6. I assume the recent 4.1 test included the $2,000 Model Y acceleration option (0.5 speed improvement) Range increases have always been free.

I would hope Ford also gives range increases free. I don’t think I would buy a speed increase at the moment.
With how Tesla is positioned right now, it would be a bad decision for Ford to make.

Would it be safe to assume that there's at least some room for Ford to tune our cars even more for performance? I mean, it is a Mustang and has to live up to that name. Would be a shame if Mach-E 0-60 and quarter mile times can't improve by anything noticeable.
 
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