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2021 Mustang Mach-E: How fast does the Ford EV charge up on road trips?
Bengt Halvorson
BENGT HALVORSON JANUARY 18, 2021


2021 Ford Mustang Mach-E, at Electrify America DC fast-charger
2021 Ford Mustang Mach-E, at Electrify America DC fast-charger
2021 Ford Mustang Mach-E, at Electrify America DC fast-charger
2021 Ford Mustang Mach-E, at Electrify America DC fast-charger
2021 Ford Mustang Mach-E


Longer road trips are now possible with nearly all U.S.-market electric cars, thanks to rather long range ratings and DC fast charging along major highways.
Each EV has a different combination of those two things, though. Getting ready for electric road trips means being realistic about both of those sets of numbers—about highway range, and about how long you’ll need to be hooked up to the charger, every few hours.

The 2021 Ford Mustang Mach-E with the Extended Range battery pack and rear-wheel drive achieves an EPA range rating of 300 miles, And Ford says that its DC fast charging for that model will add up to 61 miles of range in 10 minutes.

In our time with the Mach-E last month, an Extended Range 4X all-wheel-drive model with a 270-mile rated range, we aimed to get a quick first taste of what real-world road-trippers might see.

2021 Ford Mustang Mach-E
2021 Ford Mustang Mach-E


I didn’t see anything close to that 270 miles in a Mach-E 70-mph highway range test—more like 220 miles—but to be fair, that’s nothing unusual and the EPA range rating isn’t intended to be a gauge of range at U.S. highway speeds. What we observed was close to what the EPA highway efficiency rating suggests at face value.

As for the charging side of things, I took the Mach-E to an Electrify America station in Troutdale, Oregon, and plugged the 150-kw hardware in at 29%. The outside temperature was about 50 degrees, on a dry day with a mix of sun and clouds, and I drove to the charging stop at highway speeds.

Fuss-free fast-charging interface
First off, Plug&Charge functionality worked flawlessly on the Electrify America charger. The technology renders credit-card swipes and fobs obsolete and allows you the same kind of convenience that Tesla has been offering for many years, simply recognizing your car and the account that’s linked to it—in this case, the FordPass account (info just below) that allows nationwide “roaming” between networks.

To run through what exactly happened, the plug connector almost instantly said “connecting vehicle,” followed a few seconds later by “processing payment,” which disappeared to "Authorized" faster than I could snap a picture, replaced by a few seconds of “initiating charging” and then the familiar cooling fans and pumps of DC fast charging starting up. So from plugging in to the charge actually starting it was less than 10 seconds, with zero fumbling in pockets for anything else.

The Mach-E started right up past 55 kw and rose steadily, reaching 79 kw at 34%, then slowing its progress to eventually reach a peak 99 kw from 54% to 59%, after which it started dropping steadily—to 93 kw by 62%, 84 kw by 74%, and 53 kw at 80%.

2021 Ford Mustang Mach-E charging summary
2021 Ford Mustang Mach-E charging summary

All said, I added 51 kwh in 38 minutes. That brought the state of charge and estimated range from 29% and 67 miles to 80% (actually 81% by the time I stopped the charger) and 189 miles. It amounted to an estimated 122 miles gained in 38 minutes.

Not at full speed, apparently
During that speediest portion, we saw the estimated range leap from 128 miles to 140 miles in less than 3 minutes. That’s a rate that would correspond to about 40 miles regained in 10 minutes—only that peak rate didn’t hold for 10 minutes.

2021 Ford Mustang Mach-E charging summary
2021 Ford Mustang Mach-E charging summary

Ford says that the Extended Range Mach-E should be able to go from 10% to 80% in approximately 52 minutes. With my session’s peak 99 kw, I saw 29% to 81% in 38 minutes, which doesn’t seem far off.

When I contacted Ford about the peak-power discrepancy, Ford reiterated that the Mach-E can charge at up to 150 kw. But the spokesperson did note that the battery will accept a higher rate of charge when it is more “empty”—from about 10% on up—and that very cold weather, driving behaviors, vehicle maintenance, and battery age and state of health will have an influence.

I didn’t have the vehicle long enough to replicate the test starting at 10%—to see how much is being gained when it truly reached 150 kw—but we hope to the next time we have a Mach-E.

The Audi E-Tron, for instance also claims 150-kw fast-charging, but it actually reaches a peak of 155 kw; last year in similar temperatures I charged an E-Tron from 31 to 72% in 15 minutes.

Some takeaways
My takeaway and advice for a 70-mph road trip with repeated charges: Ideally, if you can plug in at about 10% and charge up to 80% in less than an hour, you’ll be able to use 70% of the charge—which is about 155 miles.

Ford has hinted that it has the possibility to roll out over-the-air updates that could improve range and efficiency down the line—something only Tesla has done so far.

2021 Ford Mustang Mach-E, at Electrify America DC fast-charger
2021 Ford Mustang Mach-E, at Electrify America DC fast-charger

While preliminary observations point to charging stops being a bit longer than that—and yes, of course longer than in a Tesla, even its previous V2 charge rates—the Mach-E’s driving range is consistent and predictable, and everything in the test car Ford supplied us simply worked.

Maybe even more important, there was no time lost to frustration that only early adopters tend to have the patience for. Versus some of the charging obstacles we’ve experienced even in the recent past, in just getting fast-charges to start, it was smooth sailing. The interface could find chargers and plan routes around them. It played well with the app. Charges initiated quickly. And that’s another big leap forward.
 

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Article is a little confusing.

"The Mach-E started right up past 55 kw and rose steadily, reaching 79 kw at 34%, then slowing its progress to eventually reach a peak 99 kw from 54% to 59%, after which it started dropping steadily—to 93 kw by 62%, 84 kw by 74%, and 53 kw at 80%."

It "reached 79kW" but then it "peaked at 99kW"? Makes you wonder about what he observed.

My max charge on a Tesla 250kW charger with just 8 miles left on battery was 152kW. At that point, with battery preconditioning, it should have been charging at 250kW. The MachE's 99kW/150kW is as good as Tesla's day to day 152/250kW in terms of matching chargers peak out put.

2:39 PM - 3:31 PM

52 Minutes
Battery Icon

81%

9% - 90%
Used: 60.82 kWh

Added: 63.43 kWh
Efficiency

100%
Avg Voltage: 391.92V

Max Voltage: - 402.00V
Avg Amps: 181.54A

Max Amps: 380.43A

From his pics, he was driving in the Columbia Gorge which is high wind, elevations and 70mph+ travel so getting 220 out of 270 in that energy sucking environment is not bad.

Really need a more controlled range test by AlexOnAutos or InsideEV's 70mph test.

An answer I would have liked to have seen was anything on Preconditioning in cold weather as cold battery (50F is "cold" for EV battery) will slow charging a lot. Does MachE have "Precondition" selection that you can activate when heading to charger. Something like rear window defrost that comes on for 15 minutes and then auto offs.
 

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Article is a little confusing.

"The Mach-E started right up past 55 kw and rose steadily, reaching 79 kw at 34%, then slowing its progress to eventually reach a peak 99 kw from 54% to 59%, after which it started dropping steadily—to 93 kw by 62%, 84 kw by 74%, and 53 kw at 80%."

It "reached 79kW" but then it "peaked at 99kW"? Makes you wonder about what he observed.

My max charge on a Tesla 250kW charger with just 8 miles left on battery was 152kW. At that point, with battery preconditioning, it should have been charging at 250kW. The MachE's 99kW/150kW is as good as Tesla's day to day 152/250kW in terms of matching chargers peak out put.

2:39 PM - 3:31 PM

52 Minutes
Battery Icon

81%

9% - 90%
Used: 60.82 kWh

Added: 63.43 kWh
Efficiency

100%
Avg Voltage: 391.92V

Max Voltage: - 402.00V
Avg Amps: 181.54A

Max Amps: 380.43A

From his pics, he was driving in the Columbia Gorge which is high wind, elevations and 70mph+ travel so getting 220 out of 270 in that energy sucking environment is not bad.

Really need a more controlled range test by AlexOnAutos or InsideEV's 70mph test.

An answer I would have liked to have seen was anything on Preconditioning in cold weather as cold battery (50F is "cold" for EV battery) will slow charging a lot. Does MachE have "Precondition" selection that you can activate when heading to charger. Something like rear window defrost that comes on for 15 minutes and then auto offs.
Very, very informative article.


I think the range he observed, 220 vs. 270 a difference of 18% is pretty consistent with losing 10% at highway speeds plus the up and down of the roadway accounting for the other 8%. Unlike an ICE, elevation in itself does not effect the range of an EV.

I think adding 150 miles (+ or _) in just under an hour is about right.

The real problem starts when temps drop to freezing and below: then the 220/230 miles loses another 30% to 140/150 miles which means, assuming a reserve of 30 miles, stopping every 110/120 miles for an hour to recharge.

I am waiting for a real world test of the MME LR AWD EPA 270 miles vs. the Model Y EPA 321 miles to see if in fact the Tesla with a smaller usable batter 75KW vs. 88KW in the MME actually has a greater range. Granted the Tesla is lighter, but 50 miles more with 15% smaller battery is pretty incredible. If the Tesla does have the EPA range, then the Tesla is far more efficient than the MME.
 

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Very, very informative article.


I think the range he observed, 220 vs. 270 a difference of 18% is pretty consistent with losing 10% at highway speeds plus the up and down of the roadway accounting for the other 8%. Unlike an ICE, elevation in itself does not effect the range of an EV.

I think adding 150 miles (+ or _) in just under an hour is about right.

The real problem starts when temps drop to freezing and below: then the 220/230 miles loses another 30% to 140/150 miles which means, assuming a reserve of 30 miles, stopping every 110/120 miles for an hour to recharge.

I am waiting for a real world test of the MME LR AWD EPA 270 miles vs. the Model Y EPA 321 miles to see if in fact the Tesla with a smaller usable batter 75KW vs. 88KW in the MME actually has a greater range. Granted the Tesla is lighter, but 50 miles more with 15% smaller battery is pretty incredible. If the Tesla does have the EPA range, then the Tesla is far more efficient than the MME.
You should read this article. The range is not as bad as you think. Just food for thought.


Particularly, this passage:

“The Ford Mustang Mach-E “First Edition” is EPA rated at 270 miles on a 88 kWh (usable, 98 kWh total) battery. When I set out for our 180-Mile Vermont snowboarding trip, the range given by the Mach-E was about 204 miles based on previous driving and the outside temperature. If our Tesla Model Y had said that, we wouldn’t have made it. However, the Mach-E was actually under-guessing its range vs. our Model Y, which overestimates it. Luckily, there are EVGO 50kW chargers along the route if there were issues.
It turns out we actually gained some mileage expectations along the way, and made it to the ski condo with about 40 miles of range left. So if you include the mountain climb at the end, that’s pretty fantastic. Also, if you include Tesla’s optimistic range vs. the Mustang’s pessimistic range, we landed with about the same range or percentage of battery as our Model Y. The Mustang’s battery is much bigger with 88kWh usable vs. Tesla’s 75kWh, but its EPA range is lower. Conclusion here: Those are a real 270 miles of range, and even in snow and up a mountain, the Mustang was on track to get very close to that stated range. It wouldn’t surprise me to see Ford OTA update the battery to shrink the buffer and get closer to 300 miles of range in this car like Jaguar and Audi have done with their LG packs.”
 

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Yes I had seen that article as well: I think we need to see posts from members who have gotten their MME before we can come to a definite conclusion as to range at both speed and when temps are freezing or below.
 

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Yes I had seen that article as well: I think we need to see posts from members who have gotten their MME before we can come to a definite conclusion as to range at both speed and when temps are freezing or below.
Yes, agreed. The author has the benefit of years behind the wheel of an EV. He probably has honed his regen skills and the like.
However, his story is similar to other accounts i have seen. That the MMe and MY real-world range are closer than the EPA numbers suggest, albeit the MMe needing a larger battery to do so.
 

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Yes, agreed. The author has the benefit of years behind the wheel of an EV. He probably has honed his regen skills and the like.
However, his story is similar to other accounts i have seen. That the MMe and MY real-world range are closer than the EPA numbers suggest, albeit the MMe needing a larger battery to do so.
From what I am reading and viewing, between 50 and 70 degrees the MME gets about 3 to 3.1 miles per KW, which with a 88 KW battery gives you between 264 and 272 miles of range.

The Model Y is much more efficient, with closer to 4 miles per KW, 75 KW battery about 300 miles.

The range of both in mild climates is sufficient and one of the reasons of the popularity of EV's in California.

Where the "rubber hits the road" is in the NE, Mid West, Central and NW and in acknowledgement to our forum friends up north, Canada: here we have more extreme temperatures that adversely effect range and in particular cold.

From everything I have read and speaking to friends who own EV's expect 30% loss of range when temps get to freezing and below. My friends who have Tesla and eTron have seen a loss of 20% overnight in their garages when temps are in the 30's! In other word overnight with an 80% charge, the range while sitting decreases by 20%.
 

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From what I am reading and viewing, between 50 and 70 degrees the MME gets about 3 to 3.1 miles per KW, which with a 88 KW battery gives you between 264 and 272 miles of range.

The Model Y is much more efficient, with closer to 4 miles per KW, 75 KW battery about 300 miles.

The range of both in mild climates is sufficient and one of the reasons of the popularity of EV's in California.

Where the "rubber hits the road" is in the NE, Mid West, Central and NW and in acknowledgement to our forum friends up north, Canada: here we have more extreme temperatures that adversely effect range and in particular cold.

From everything I have read and speaking to friends who own EV's expect 30% loss of range when temps get to freezing and below. My friends who have Tesla and eTron have seen a loss of 20% overnight in their garages when temps are in the 30's! In other word overnight with an 80% charge, the range while sitting decreases by 20%.
Ford engineers have said that the MMe, and EVs in general, should be left plugged in overnight to prevent such effects from the cold.
This is similar to plugging in an ICE engine block warmer, or the 12v battery saver commonly used in colder climates.

Just Food for thought.
 

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Ford engineers have said that the MMe, and EVs in general, should be left plugged in overnight to prevent such effects from the cold.
This is similar to plugging in an ICE engine block warmer, or the 12v battery saver commonly used in colder climates.

Just Food for thought.
When the MME is plugged in is it charging?

I thought we were advised to charge to 80%, except when a trip is planned then to 100%.
 

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When the MME is plugged in is it charging?

I thought we were advised to charge to 80%, except when a trip is planned then to 100%.
You still cap the charging. But apparently there are still benefits of leaving it charged it after you have reached your limit.
 

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You still cap the charging. But apparently there are still benefits of leaving it charged it after you have reached your limit.
Are you saying that if you leave the charger plugged in, you can still cap the charge at 80%?

and

That once the 80% is reached there is still a benefit when the weather is cold to keep the charger plugged in?

Or

As it gets cold, the battery dischargers and by plugging it in the battery is maintained at 80%?
 

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We'll see but my guess is that the Ford Engineers designed the charging algorithms, battery holdback, depletion/warranty considerations based on a non-tech savvy userbase . I think the base design point was that most people are going to keep it plugged in and charging when home.
 

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My friends who have Tesla and eTron have seen a loss of 20% overnight in their garages when temps are in the 30's! In other word overnight with an 80% charge, the range while sitting decreases by 20%.
I believe the cold temperature loss on standing is temporary. i.e. If you were to heat the battery back up (while still in your garage) to the sweet spot operating temperature, you would see the indicated range go back up. That is why Ford emphasizes the preconditioning while you are still connected to your wall charger before departure. Now if you depart with the cold battery, that is a different scenario. Can anyone with real world experience chime in here?
 

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Are you saying that if you leave the charger plugged in, you can still cap the charge at 80%?

and

That once the 80% is reached there is still a benefit when the weather is cold to keep the charger plugged in?

Or

As it gets cold, the battery dischargers and by plugging it in the battery is maintained at 80%?
You can cap the charge, but I can no longer get to the owners manual from the FordPass app to get the details.

As for the rest, I don’t know. Like I mentioned earlier, the information about leaving it plugged in came from an interview with Ford engineers.
 

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We'll see but my guess is that the Ford Engineers designed the charging algorithms, battery holdback, depletion/warranty considerations based on a non-tech savvy userbase . I think the base design point was that most people are going to keep it plugged in and charging when home.
I think you are 100% correct:

With my iPhone and iPad, I plug them overnight and in the morning I unplug them. I do not monitor them to charge only to 93%.

With an EV, and especially in the event of an emergency use, when I come home I intend to plug it in so that when I need it it will ready to go with a full charge.

We were just notified of Covid vaccine availability in a hospital 80 miles away, but only a 90 minute drive. The appointment is this Monday. But it could have been in several hours later the same day. Can you imagine, after trying for months, hours a day, to get an appointment, not being able to take that appointment because my MME had only a 30% charge????

No I intend to keep my MME at 100% charge! Never know when I might need the full range and if that causes some small battery degradation at 100,000 miles I will deal with that when and if that happens!

(An EV's is not like an ICE where a 1/2 tank is not a problem: 5 minutes at a nearby station and you have a full tank.)


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That is why Ford emphasizes the preconditioning while you are still connected to your wall charger before departure. Now if you depart with the cold battery, that is a different scenario. Can anyone with real world experience chime in here?
You are correct at least as far as a Tesla goes.

Ford appears to have identical controls.

One I'm still trying to figure out is if Ford has "Preconditioning" battery as separate control to use when going to chargers on the road or if one wants to use stored energy/range to warm battery for single pedal driving as cold affects ability to regen as well as overall capacity for range.
 

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Ford engineers have said that the MMe, and EVs in general, should be left plugged in overnight to prevent such effects from the cold.
This is similar to plugging in an ICE engine block warmer, or the 12v battery saver commonly used in colder climates.

Just Food for thought.
Living in the cold north of Ontario Canada with now our 4th winter with our Chevy Bolt. We always leave our Bolt plugged in overnight in winter and keep battery charged to 90%. This is recommended by Chevy as the charging system turns on every so often to keep the battery above a certain temperature. When it's really cold, we hear the charger and car heat the battery 4 or 6 times during an 8 hour period.

After 65000km we have zero battery degradation based on a test I performed last summer. The car still can easily get 420km range when no AC is on and 390km with AC during summer. That's based upon average rural road highways speeds of 95 to 100k./hr. Treat you battery well and it will give you a very long life.
 

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I think you are 100% correct:

With my iPhone and iPad, I plug them overnight and in the morning I unplug them. I do not monitor them to charge only to 93%.

With an EV, and especially in the event of an emergency use, when I come home I intend to plug it in so that when I need it it will ready to go with a full charge.

We were just notified of Covid vaccine availability in a hospital 80 miles away, but only a 90 minute drive. The appointment is this Monday. But it could have been in several hours later the same day. Can you imagine, after trying for months, hours a day, to get an appointment, not being able to take that appointment because my MME had only a 30% charge????

No I intend to keep my MME at 100% charge! Never know when I might need the full range and if that causes some small battery degradation at 100,000 miles I will deal with that when and if that happens!

(An EV's is not like an ICE where a 1/2 tank is not a problem: 5 minutes at a nearby station and you have a full tank.)


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I agree on charging to 100% on Level 2. Ford has clearly added a lot of buffer to this car's battery (more than I'd like), so charging fully is fine, I believe. It seems a lot of people are worried about the life of Li batteries, but the real world results that I've seen indicate that those worries are at least a little overblown.

One advantage of having a buffer on the "top end" of the battery is that you still have regen braking when you are charged to 100%. This might sound like a minor deal, but it isn't once you get used to having regen braking--you really miss it when it isn't there and you are still zooming up to a stop sign, wondering why the hell the car isn't stopping?

The Chevy Bolt has essentially zero regen braking when the battery is fully charged, while the Mach E still has it, which is an indication that Ford is protecting the battery when you are charged to "100%". (I put 100% in quotation marks here to note that you really haven't charged the 98 kwhr battery to 100%, but rather charged it to 88 kwhr fully, and that the dash indicates 100%. The battery is clearly not fully charged, because if it were, the regen wouldn't work. And it does...)

I like having regen when "fully charged", but I still question if Ford really needed that much buffer.

I want them to leave some of the buffer in, for all of the obvious reasons: to provide some battery protection, to potentially maintain range after a few years of usage, and to provide regen braking at "100%". But I question if they really need 10 kwhr to do all of that? I'm guessing, and it is only a guess, that 5 kwhr would have been enough.

bwtfdik?
 

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You are correct at least as far as a Tesla goes.

Ford appears to have identical controls.

One I'm still trying to figure out is if Ford has "Preconditioning" battery as separate control to use when going to chargers on the road or if one wants to use stored energy/range to warm battery for single pedal driving as cold affects ability to regen as well as overall capacity for range.
I am unable to find any "preconditioning" mode in the MME's command structure. I do wish that it were there.

I don't know if somehow preconditioning happens if you have a DC Fast charger set into the nav as a destination. I hope so, but it isn't in the owner's manual, as far as I know...?

If preconditioning doesn't exist, it should. And it should be both automatic when driving to a charger, and also a manual option. It is a big deal on those occasions when you want to DCFC and it's cold outside.

I surmise that the reason that Tesla added the feature was that they discovered that a cold battery charges very slowly initially, and that waiting for the charging process to warm it up (which clearly happens--you can see it on cold days at a DCFC) is a painfully slow process. I give Tesla kudos for putting the preconditioning in, and I really hope that Ford has this at the top of their "OTA to-do list."
 

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Living in the cold north of Ontario Canada with now our 4th winter with our Chevy Bolt. We always leave our Bolt plugged in overnight in winter and keep battery charged to 90%. This is recommended by Chevy as the charging system turns on every so often to keep the battery above a certain temperature. When it's really cold, we hear the charger and car heat the battery 4 or 6 times during an 8 hour period.

After 65000km we have zero battery degradation based on a test I performed last summer. The car still can easily get 420km range when no AC is on and 390km with AC during summer. That's based upon average rural road highways speeds of 95 to 100k./hr. Treat you battery well and it will give you a very long life.
Interesting. Thanks for posting that.

As far as I can tell, and I haven't really done any scientific testing, my Bolt at 48k miles likewise still has the advertised range. I note that in the region where I live, a lot of people drive faster than 95-100 km/hr. I see a lot of 110-120 km/hr drivers and on the interstate you see 130-135 for maybe half the vehicles.

Obviously, those speeds impact range a lot.
 
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