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Would you buy another ELECTRIC VEHICLE?

  • Yes

    Votes: 35 89.7%
  • No

    Votes: 3 7.7%
  • Undecided

    Votes: 1 2.6%
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February 24th 2022 I got my 1st Electric ⚡ vehicle as I waited for the Mach-E to arrive later this year..

I just received my 1st (2 Month Electric Bill) & it went to tier 2 KWH (see pic) & went from a 2 month Avg. Of $120-130 to $299 😬 I also charge 110V (Level 1 Slow charging overnight.) LADWP.

I didn’t realize Electric would cost more then what I spent on Gas ⛽ for my previous ICE vehicle ($100-125 p/mo.)

Does this seem right for many of you??
Also when I go to charge at Charge point, it’s usually about 1-2 Hrs. & about $1 & change.. Seems like Charging stations may be affordable. What’s your take? Or recommendations?

Thank you.
 

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Well, rates are very high where you are at. 24 cent a KWH is the highest rate here in Michigan and that is on a time of day rate. Base rate is 16 cents a KWH. So I can charge at 11 cent a KWH between 9pm and 7am. See if there are any EV incentives from your power company. Being in CA you would think there would be EV incentives.
 

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Well, rates are very high where you are at. 24 cent a KWH is the highest rate here in Michigan and that is on a time of day rate. Base rate is 16 cents a KWH. So I can charge at 11 cent a KWH between 9pm and 7am. See if there are any EV incentives from your power company. Being in CA you would think there would be EV incentives.
I am in Cali.our bill only about $30 more. We charge on a level 2 charger from 9pm-5am. We also don't charge every night, only when we get close to 100 miles of range. California does offer incentives and rebates for installation of level 2 charger. I know charger on 110 cost more because it takes so long.
 

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February 24th 2022 I got my 1st Electric ⚡ vehicle as I waited for the Mach-E to arrive later this year..

I just received my 1st (2 Month Electric Bill) & it went to tier 2 KWH (see pic) & went from a 2 month Avg. Of $120-130 to $299 😬 I also charge 110V (Level 1 Slow charging overnight.) LADWP.

I didn’t realize Electric would cost more then what I spent on Gas ⛽ for my previous ICE vehicle ($100-125 p/mo.)

Does this seem right for many of you??
Also when I go to charge at Charge point, it’s usually about 1-2 Hrs. & about $1 & change.. Seems like Charging stations may be affordable. What’s your take? Or recommendations?

Thank you.
I think first you want to look at an electric bill for the same period BEFORE you got the ev, This way you can compare your kwh usage for the same time period BEFORE the EV. The other thing, unfortunately the 110 is less efficient than a nema 14-50. Also, it's a good idea to calculate what your actual KWH utility rate is. As an example, my flat rate here in GA is around 6 cents kwh. but with taxes and fees it's around 14 cents.
 

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2022 Select MMe with eAWD and Comfort & Tech package in Rapid Red
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If you're not already, you should limit charging to off-peak times to get the best electricity usage rates. Here are the times for Los Angeles DWP:



I took that from this document that describes in detail what rates you pay based on exactly where you live, how your block is zoned, and a few other things I don't understand. You should call LADWP to see what rates you can get based on these times.

But yeah, what you pay for electricity in LA is WAY higher than anywhere I've lived (CO, KS, IA, TN, TX, NJ).On the other hand, I'm guessing the gas prices are proportionally higher there, too. So, even if your electric bill goes up (which of course, it has to), I'll bet that you're still saving quite a lot of money on "fuel" costs for your EV compared to an ICE.
 

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Well, rates are very high where you are at. 24 cent a KWH is the highest rate here in Michigan and that is on a time of day rate. Base rate is 16 cents a KWH. So I can charge at 11 cent a KWH between 9pm and 7am. See if there are any EV incentives from your power company. Being in CA you would think there would be EV incentives.
Yikes! We are in west. Pa have west Penn elect and pay .056 kWh. Even the most costly Duquesne elect is .12 kWh.
 

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I know charger on 110 cost more because it takes so long.
I believe the cost of electricity is the amount of KW used, not the time.

If you use 110 and it uses 3 KW per hour for 5 hours, that is 15 KW.

If you use L2 at 20 KWH per hour for 1 hour, that is 20 KW.

The key here is use the charger went rates are lowest.
 

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Your rates are higher than my provider here in Tampa area. I calculated the additional cost in a spreadsheet before I had my level 48 amp level 2 EVSE installed.

When I received my 1st bill after a full month of charging the MME, it only went up by $30 vs the $45 I had calculated and budgeted for.

In my situation, I only charge once at the end of my week, usually Saturday afternoons when I’m done running all of my errands. I only commute to work 3 days a week and work from home the 2 remaining weekdays. We have EVSEs at my job that I plug my vehicle into whenever I’m there. That reduces how much I need to charge at my home.

My electric company also doesn’t have peak and off peak pricing. It’s one rate for anything up to 1,000kwh and another rate for anything above 1,000kwh. The blended rate is effectively .12 per kWh.

So for my situation I still come much better than I did when paying for gas for my prior vehicle. Everyone’s situation will obviously be different depending on where you live, how much you drive and your electric company. It’s not a one size fits all situation.

I’m also having solar panels installed in about a month or so and that’ll cut down on how much grid electricity I use. I even factored in how much I’ll need to charge at home when I had my solar system designed.
 

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I average 500 +/- miles a month and my driving miles per kWh is in the 3's so for easy math 500/3 = 167 kWh per month usage at 0.049 cents per kW off-peak 2200hrs to 0800hrs and all weekend, which adds $8.18 to my bill and a cost per mile of 1.6 Cents. The power company incentive with proof of an EV drops the off-peak rate for the entire house.
PS: I'm still on my first cup of coffee so if there are any Math majors reading this feel free to challenge my calculations.
 

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I average 500 +/- miles a month and my driving miles per kWh is in the 3's so for easy math 500/3 = 167 kWh per month usage at 0.049 cents per kW off-peak 2200hrs to 0800hrs and all weekend, which adds $8.18 to my bill and a cost per mile of 1.6 Cents. The power company incentive with proof of an EV drops the off-peak rate for the entire house.
PS: I'm still on my first cup of coffee so if there are any Math majors reading this feel free to challenge my calculations.
This is interesting, as you must be on the EV time of use rate from NV Energy. As I await the delivery of my MME, I have considered utilizing this plan once the car does arrive. However, I also had rooftop solar installed last month and the project advisor mentioned that his big thing is people are using solar energy incorrectly. He thinks you should use energy during the day as much as possible to utilize the energy being produced by the system first, before it gets sent back to the grid. His reasoning being that for each kWh you send back to the grid, your net metering credit is about 70% of the cost of buying that kWh back when you're underproducing your usage. This isn't the forum for it, but that sounded wrong to me, because the power company isn't looking at the time I used my generated energy, instead they are looking at the difference between what I consumed and produced for the entire month (at least I think that's how it works).

Anyway, for the original poster, that just sounds wrong altogether. As others have said, you need to look at the usage for that exact month with EV compared to the prior year without EV. Also realize that the weather is warming up in March, which means you are naturally going to start to use more energy in your home in March as compared to February (with or without an EV). Another thing that you are already aware of, but with a tiered system like yours, you're already building in a 25% price increase to every kWh over 1,000 for the month. So if in February you used 985 kWh and then in March you went to 1,333 kwh, you had a 33% increase in usage which gets compounded by the fact that you had a 25% increase in cost for almost everyone of those kWh.

You didn't share your usage for the prior month, and you didn't give us context as to how much you drive and how much kWh you required to recharge your vehicle for the month. Every situation is different, so context is important
 

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This is interesting, as you must be on the EV time of use rate from NV Energy. As I await the delivery of my MME, I have considered utilizing this plan once the car does arrive. However, I also had rooftop solar installed last month and the project advisor mentioned that his big thing is people are using solar energy incorrectly. He thinks you should use energy during the day as much as possible to utilize the energy being produced by the system first, before it gets sent back to the grid. His reasoning being that for each kWh you send back to the grid, your net metering credit is about 70% of the cost of buying that kWh back when you're underproducing your usage. This isn't the forum for it, but that sounded wrong to me, because the power company isn't looking at the time I used my generated energy, instead they are looking at the difference between what I consumed and produced for the entire month (at least I think that's how it works).

Anyway, for the original poster, that just sounds wrong altogether. As others have said, you need to look at the usage for that exact month with EV compared to the prior year without EV. Also realize that the weather is warming up in March, which means you are naturally going to start to use more energy in your home in March as compared to February (with or without an EV). Another thing that you are already aware of, but with a tiered system like yours, you're already building in a 25% price increase to every kWh over 1,000 for the month. So if in February you used 985 kWh and then in March you went to 1,333 kwh, you had a 33% increase in usage which gets compounded by the fact that you had a 25% increase in cost for almost everyone of those kWh.

You didn't share your usage for the prior month, and you didn't give us context as to how much you drive and how much kWh you required to recharge your vehicle for the month. Every situation is different, so context is important
Correct, I'm on the NV Power tiered system. Your solar guy sounds incorrect however I don't have solar so I haven't researched the subject. As I'm sure that you know, when the summer rates start the peak period from 1300 to 1900hrs. goes to .43 cents per. so I would definitely get an 'informed' second opinion.
 

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Correct, I'm on the NV Power tiered system. Your solar guy sounds incorrect however I don't have solar so I haven't researched the subject. As I'm sure that you know, when the summer rates start the peak period from 1300 to 1900hrs. goes to .43 cents per. so I would definitely get an 'informed' second opinion.
I will definitely seek other opinions and get some insight into how it all works.

Another completely off topic thought but an email just popped up from a local Las Vegas Ford dealership.... They have a used Star White Metallic 2021 MME Select SR RWD with 11,320 miles and the asking price is...... $60,995! That is insane
 

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I will definitely seek other opinions and get some insight into how it all works.

Another completely off topic thought but an email just popped up from a local Las Vegas Ford dealership.... They have a used Star White Metallic 2021 MME Select SR RWD with 11,320 miles and the asking price is...... $60,995! That is insane
Wow! If I didn't love the MMe as much as I do I would seriously consider selling it since mine is a Premium RWD/ER with only 7600 miles. My two 'kids' who are Tesla owners keep trying to get me to move to the 'dark-side' 🙄
 

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Wow! If I didn't love the MMe as much as I do I would seriously consider selling it since mine is a Premium RWD/ER with only 7600 miles. My two 'kids' who are Tesla owners keep trying to get me to move to the 'dark-side' 🙄
I've actually considered selling mine and getting an EV6, but hard to justify when I've had no issues and it's been a pleasure to own.
 

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His reasoning being that for each kWh you send back to the grid, your net metering credit is about 70% of the cost of buying that kWh back when you're underproducing your usage. This isn't the forum for it, but that sounded wrong to me, because the power company isn't looking at the time I used my generated energy, instead they are looking at the difference between what I consumed and produced for the entire month (at least I think that's how it works).
I don't know about NV, but when I lived in Austin, we had a 5.25kW solar array, and our grid sell-back rate was indeed about 70% of what they sell it to you for. The bill was NOT just a difference of what we consumed vs. used. They charged us for what we consumed minus about 70% of what we sold back. (The sell-back rate varied, but most of the time it was about that.) So, yes, we did indeed try to use every drop of solar that we produced during the summer months. Our AC used about 3.5kW, so it usually wasn't that big of a problem. I suspect it wouldn't be in NV, either.
 

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Another completely off topic thought but an email just popped up from a local Las Vegas Ford dealership.... They have a used Star White Metallic 2021 MME Select SR RWD with 11,320 miles and the asking price is...... $60,995! That is insane
Yeah, around here, all the dealers mark up about the same: Selects are $5k over MSRP, Premiums are $10k over, GTs are $15k, and one dealership I found is even charging $20k over for a GT-PE. I have never EVER in my life respected a dealership I encountered. Every single one has screwed me in some way, and ALL of them tried to screw me harder than they were able to. I can't wait to find how this one is going to try when my MME is actually delivered.
 

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Yeah, around here, all the dealers mark up about the same: Selects are $5k over MSRP, Premiums are $10k over, GTs are $15k, and one dealership I found is even charging $20k over for a GT-PE. I have never EVER in my life respected a dealership I encountered. Every single one has screwed me in some way, and ALL of them tried to screw me harder than they were able to. I can't wait to find how this one is going to try when my MME is actually delivered.
Yeah I halfway expect silly markup attempts on the new ones, but to see a used MME with over 11k miles on it, going for over $15k over MSRP for when it was new, and on a base model Select no less.... that was just ridiculous to me. I'm getting my 2022 Premium ER MME for nearly $5k less, one year newer, no miles, and that's not even factoring in the $7,500 tax credit that the new one qualifies for. Again I say, just ridiculous
 

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I believe the cost of electricity is the amount of KW used, not the time.

If you use 110 and it uses 3 KW per hour for 5 hours, that is 15 KW.

If you use L2 at 20 KWH per hour for 1 hour, that is 20 KW.
Electricity is charged per KiloWatt-Hour(kWh) which is total Energy consumed. Power is rated in kW which is the product of Voltage and Amperage (current flow). To get your 3 kW on 110 VAC would require a 30 Amp circuit and plug. Most homes top out at 20 Amp receptacles and single-pole breakers. With a 20 Amp circuit, you might see a 2 kW charging rate.

So, to use your examples, using the standard 110 wall outlet and a 2 kW charge rate for 5 hours, you would use 10 kWh. Using an L2 EVSE that can deliver 20 kW of power for one hour is 20 kWh. You get twice as much energy transferred into your EV with the L2 charger in 20% the time. If you have a long commute this can be the difference between being able to charge overnight or having to DC Fast Charge outside your home to make up the difference.

The electric motors in any electric vehicle are rated in Horsepower or kW. Battery packs are rated in kWh. If your EV has 400 kW motors and a 100 kWh Battery Pack, you could theoretically get 15 minutes of full power from the motors before exhausting the charge in your EV. Since we don’t drive at 100% full throttle for more than a few seconds, you get more than that quarter-hour of potential energy from your fully charged EV.
The key here is use the charger went rates are lowest.
I’ll agree with that! Having an L2 EVSE and 240 VAC available where you park overnight allows you to take the best advantage of the time the off-peak rate is available.
 

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Electricity is charged per KiloWatt-Hour(kWh) which is total Energy consumed. Power is rated in kW which is the product of Voltage and Amperage (current flow). To get your 3 kW on 110 VAC would require a 30 Amp circuit and plug. Most homes top out at 20 Amp receptacles and single-pole breakers. With a 20 Amp circuit, you might see a 2 kW charging rate.

So, to use your examples, using the standard 110 wall outlet and a 2 kW charge rate for 5 hours, you would use 10 kWh. Using an L2 EVSE that can deliver 20 kW of power for one hour is 20 kWh. You get twice as much energy transferred into your EV with the L2 charger in 20% the time. If you have a long commute this can be the difference between being able to charge overnight or having to DC Fast Charge outside your home to make up the difference.

The electric motors in any electric vehicle are rated in Horsepower or kW. Battery packs are rated in kWh. If your EV has 400 kW motors and a 100 kWh Battery Pack, you could theoretically get 15 minutes of full power from the motors before exhausting the charge in your EV. Since we don’t drive at 100% full throttle for more than a few seconds, you get more than that quarter-hour of potential energy from your fully charged EV.
I’ll agree with that! Having an L2 EVSE and 240 VAC available where you park overnight allows you to take the best advantage of the time the off-peak rate is available.
Ok. Dumb Question alert! Sorry in advance…If a L2 EVSE delivers 20kw per hour, and an ER Mach E has roughly a 90kw battery, shouldn’t it only take roughly 4.5hrs to fully charge the car?

If I get electricity for .10 a kw, and my battery is 90kw, then wouldn’t it only cost $9 to charge my MME from 0% to 100%?
 
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