Mach-E Forum | Ford Mustang Mach-E Forum and News banner

Would you buy another ELECTRIC VEHICLE?

  • Yes

    Votes: 35 89.7%
  • No

    Votes: 3 7.7%
  • Undecided

    Votes: 1 2.6%
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
2022 Select MMe with eAWD and Comfort & Tech package in Rapid Red
Joined
·
17 Posts
If you're not already, you should limit charging to off-peak times to get the best electricity usage rates. Here are the times for Los Angeles DWP:



I took that from this document that describes in detail what rates you pay based on exactly where you live, how your block is zoned, and a few other things I don't understand. You should call LADWP to see what rates you can get based on these times.

But yeah, what you pay for electricity in LA is WAY higher than anywhere I've lived (CO, KS, IA, TN, TX, NJ).On the other hand, I'm guessing the gas prices are proportionally higher there, too. So, even if your electric bill goes up (which of course, it has to), I'll bet that you're still saving quite a lot of money on "fuel" costs for your EV compared to an ICE.
 

·
Registered
2022 Select MMe with eAWD and Comfort & Tech package in Rapid Red
Joined
·
17 Posts
His reasoning being that for each kWh you send back to the grid, your net metering credit is about 70% of the cost of buying that kWh back when you're underproducing your usage. This isn't the forum for it, but that sounded wrong to me, because the power company isn't looking at the time I used my generated energy, instead they are looking at the difference between what I consumed and produced for the entire month (at least I think that's how it works).
I don't know about NV, but when I lived in Austin, we had a 5.25kW solar array, and our grid sell-back rate was indeed about 70% of what they sell it to you for. The bill was NOT just a difference of what we consumed vs. used. They charged us for what we consumed minus about 70% of what we sold back. (The sell-back rate varied, but most of the time it was about that.) So, yes, we did indeed try to use every drop of solar that we produced during the summer months. Our AC used about 3.5kW, so it usually wasn't that big of a problem. I suspect it wouldn't be in NV, either.
 

·
Registered
2022 Select MMe with eAWD and Comfort & Tech package in Rapid Red
Joined
·
17 Posts
Another completely off topic thought but an email just popped up from a local Las Vegas Ford dealership.... They have a used Star White Metallic 2021 MME Select SR RWD with 11,320 miles and the asking price is...... $60,995! That is insane
Yeah, around here, all the dealers mark up about the same: Selects are $5k over MSRP, Premiums are $10k over, GTs are $15k, and one dealership I found is even charging $20k over for a GT-PE. I have never EVER in my life respected a dealership I encountered. Every single one has screwed me in some way, and ALL of them tried to screw me harder than they were able to. I can't wait to find how this one is going to try when my MME is actually delivered.
 

·
Registered
2022 Select MMe with eAWD and Comfort & Tech package in Rapid Red
Joined
·
17 Posts
Ok. Dumb Question alert! Sorry in advance…If a L2 EVSE delivers 20kw per hour, and an ER Mach E has roughly a 90kw battery, shouldn’t it only take roughly 4.5hrs to fully charge the car?

If I get electricity for .10 a kw, and my battery is 90kw, then wouldn’t it only cost $9 to charge my MME from 0% to 100%?
Hi @MRyan7465:

The power delivered by your EVSE is rated in watts or kilowatts. The storage capacity of your battery is rated in kWh (kilowatt·hours), or roughly, the product of the wattage supplied and the time over which it is supplied. Your electricity usage rates use the same metric - kWh, which is how much wattage you use for how long. If you use 100 watts for an hour, you've used 0.1kWh. If your car has a 90kWh battery, it can supply 1000 watts for 90 hours straight.

Charging your battery isn't quite 1:1 EVSE power to capacity. In other words, if your EVSE can deliver 20kW, it won't take exactly 90kWh / 20kW = 4.5h. There are losses, inefficiencies, and electrical & chemical restrictions. But, yeah, that's about right. It shouldn't take twice that long, but I wouldn't be surprised if it was a half hour longer.

If you pay $0.10 per kWh, and you draw 20kW for 4.5 hours, you use the 90 kWh, and you'll pay 90kWh * $0.10 per kWh which comes to $9.00. So, yes, you're in the right ballpark.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top