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I was looking into run-flat tire options specifically for the Mustang Mach-E and Ford recommends going with the Pirelli CINTURATO P7 RUNFLAT. Its an all-season tire that's also available in a version with better mud and snow capabilities.
Another recommended all-season run-flat tire option is the Bridgestone DriveGuard.
Does anyone know what other options we can go with?
 

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I was looking into run-flat tire options specifically for the Mustang Mach-E and Ford recommends going with the Pirelli CINTURATO P7 RUNFLAT. Its an all-season tire that's also available in a version with better mud and snow capabilities.
Another recommended all-season run-flat tire option is the Bridgestone DriveGuard.
Does anyone know what other options we can go with?
I have the Pirelli RF on my Mercedes. Excellent tire in dry, wet and snow.
 

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If you're using the Mach-E for "spirited driving", or if you want a soft ride, I'd always recommend against run-flats. Their sidewalls are so stiff, they damage the ride quality too much.
 

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If you're using the Mach-E for "spirited driving", or if you want a soft ride, I'd always recommend against run-flats. Their sidewalls are so stiff, they damage the ride quality too much.
Sorry but not true.

I have RF on my Mercedes and the ride is superb.

Today engineers design suspensions with RF in mind.

What is sad is that their is no provision for a space saver spare.
 

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Sorry but not true.

I have RF on my Mercedes and the ride is superb.

Today engineers design suspensions with RF in mind.

What is sad is that their is no provision for a space saver spare.
The rear axle and motor are in-line, so there is no real packaging space available for a donut. The Model Y is also lacking the spare.

Both companies could have put a donut spare up-front, but chose to add a frunk instead.
 

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The rear axle and motor are in-line, so there is no real packaging space available for a donut. The Model Y is also lacking the spare.

Both companies could have put a donut spare up-front, but chose to add a frunk instead.
I believe both the Model Y and MME have storage space under the floor in the rear. A space saver spare is less than 8 inches in depth.

I bet if they wanted to they could have designed the space under the floor to fit a space saver spare.

The main reason for its exclusion is weight: the extra weight of the space saver spare, plus jack and tire lug wrench decreases mileage in both an ICE and an EV.

Also the feeling is that changing a tire is a "lost art". When I learned to drive I also learned how to change a tire - actually I knew how to change a tire before I learned to drive. That is no longer the case.
 

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I bet if they wanted to they could have designed the space under the floor to fit a space saver spare.
That is the space they have allocated for the mobile charger. I have seen it stored there in MME pictures. Beneath the rear seat is the 2nd layer of the battery pack which is only used in the extended range battery. However, the battery case is the same for both the standard and extended range MME. The mobile charger is likely to be needed much more than the spare tire in my opinion.
 

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I believe both the Model Y and MME have storage space under the floor in the rear. A space saver spare is less than 8 inches in depth.

I bet if they wanted to they could have designed the space under the floor to fit a space saver spare.

The main reason for its exclusion is weight: the extra weight of the space saver spare, plus jack and tire lug wrench decreases mileage in both an ICE and an EV.

Also the feeling is that changing a tire is a "lost art". When I learned to drive I also learned how to change a tire - actually I knew how to change a tire before I learned to drive. That is no longer the case.
Ah, yes. I forgot about the weight. They would have never considered a spare in the frunk.

Even if they had added a donut in the back, at 8” in height, you would lose approximately 9 cubic-feet of interior storage space. There’s not so much to begin with.

So we are left with run-flats or road-side assistance. Or pay for a new tire-pressure sensor if you use the flat-fix.
 

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Ah, yes. I forgot about the weight. They would have never considered a spare in the frunk.

Even if they had added a donut in the back, at 8” in height, you would lose approximately 9 cubic-feet of interior storage space. There’s not so much to begin with.

So we are left with run-flats or road-side assistance. Or pay for a new tire-pressure sensor if you use the flat-fix.
Run Flats vs. Non Run Flats is the of the most debated topics on other boards for other cars.

I have RF and here is what I have decided to do:

I went to Home Depot and bought a good portable tire inflator, about $60 and I keep in my trunk:

  • If I have a slow leak, because of the TPS I will know. I intend to stop, re-inflate and continue on my trip to the nearest gas station to have the tire fixed. There is discussion of whether you can or cannot fix a RF. In fact a RF can be fixed like any other tire.
  • If it is a blowout, then the RF at 50 mph is good for 70 miles to either a repair shop or motel.
The problem with a blowout is that the RF must be replaced. Presently most tire outlets do not stock RF, but as more are used that will change.

The problem with using a spray can of Fix-a-Flat, is that if the compound is not removed with 2 hours, it is nearly impossible to remove from the inside of the wheel. The labor involved is often more expensive than the cost of a new wheel.

So keep in mind that if you use Fix It or something similar not only must you replace the TPS, but you must remove the tire, clean the wheel and then clean the goo from inside of the tire. Failure to do this will require you to replace the tire as well.

see: Why NOT to Repair a Flat Tire With Tire Sealant

and finally and most importantly from FIX-A-FLAT:




"We do not recommend installing Fix-a-Flat into quiet tires. The tread area of a quiet tire is coated with a layer of foam. If the sealant is installed, it will be instantly absorbed into the foam, rendering it unable to reach and treat the puncture. The sealant will also likely result in tire vibrations. Additionally, there is no way to remove the sealant from the foam and the tire will likely need to be replaced."
and

"Additionally, some run flat tires have a foam insert to help support the run flat concept. If the tire does have the foam insert, sealant will be absorbed in the foam and will not reach the puncture hole."

and

Yes. If the temperature falls below 32 degrees Fahrenheit, Fix-a-Flat will freeze. The product in the can is not damaged and may be used after thawing (we recommend warming the can using your vehicle’s interior heater vent). If the product is in the tire, and freezing weather is predicted, then immediately take the vehicle to a qualified tire professional for repair.
see: FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

As I see it:

  1. if the run flats have quiet foam, which they probably do, and you use FixAFlat, you will have to pay to have the wheel cleaned and then pay for new TPS and a new tire.
2.If you just drive on the RF, you only have to replace the tire.

3.If you use the tire inflator, keep the tire pressure up so that you do not run on the tire sidewalls, you might be able to have the tire fixed and not have to replace the tire, have the wheel cleaned or replace the TPS.

I have chosen option 3.

Of course a fourth option is to buy a space saver spare and just keep it in the back, but that is messy and takes up room.

see: Flat Tire Repair With Fix-a-Flat | Tire Puncture Repair | Tire Repair - Paul Campanella’s Auto & Tire Center

.
 

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Sorry but not true.

I have RF on my Mercedes and the ride is superb.

Today engineers design suspensions with RF in mind.

What is sad is that their is no provision for a space saver spare.
I currently drive a BMW 3 Series with run flat (RF) tires, and I've been driving with RFs for the last 10 years. I absolutely LOVE them and they've saved my hide many times while on the road. RF tires are a bit stiffer, which isn't so great if you want a soft ride. Also, they used to be much costlier but that is no longer the case. I ordered my Mach E a couple of months ago, and I hope there's an option for RF tires; this is really the best option when you don't have a spare.
 

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I currently drive a BMW 3 Series with run flat (RF) tires, and I've been driving with RFs for the last 10 years. I absolutely LOVE them and they've saved my hide many times while on the road. RF tires are a bit stiffer, which isn't so great if you want a soft ride. Also, they used to be much costlier but that is no longer the case. I ordered my Mach E a couple of months ago, and I hope there's an option for RF tires; this is really the best option when you don't have a spare.
RF are standard on the MME.
 

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RF are standard on the MME.
Really? I looked everywhere, and all I see is reference to all-season with an option for summer tires. Did someone from Ford confirm?
 

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NOT RUN FLA

Not run flats - Michelin Primacy 225/5? / R19 103H on the Premium trim.
Really? I looked everywhere, and all I see is reference to all-season with an option for summer tires. Did someone from Ford confirm?
It would be good to know...if the Mach-E doesn't come with a spare (and from what I can see there is no plan to include a spare tire), then run flats are the best way to go. I haven't seen anything definitive on this yet.
 

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It would be good to know...if the Mach-E doesn't come with a spare (and from what I can see there is no plan to include a spare tire), then run flats are the best way to go. I haven't seen anything definitive on this yet.
Having been to the Road Show, there is no place for a spare and both Premium vehicles had the same non-run flat tires. Not definitive for final product, but also probably not changing either. All Ford's documents so far say nothing about run flats. They are providing a "fix a flat" product and a pump.
 
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