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It's a little confusing because the ElectrifyAmerica website doesn't seem to list the charging rate of the chargers at each location. For instance, when I click on a few in the locations that I might need to use for a roadtrip from Denver to Las Vegas, they usually just show "4 CCS, 1 CCS-CHA-deMO". If I understand it right, those are just the plug types, right? Which doesn't tell us anything about the charging rate?

I just loaded the ElectrifyAmerica app. It looks like it might show the charging rates for each charger there, and whether it's currently in use (can't say for sure as only shows a preview unless you set up an account and log in).

So, let's say I'm doing a roadtrip and want to fill 200 miles worth for the next leg. If I'm averaging 3.5 miles/kWh, that's 57 kWh I need to "fill", right?

Ford's site says on a 150 kw charger, you can fill 47 miles in 10 minutes. So 42 minutes to fill 200 miles worth. At 89 cents/minute, that $37. Woah!
 

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I'm pretty sure all EA locations have both 150 and 350kW chargers (CCS). The ChaDeMo chargers (usually only one per location) are 50kW, but aren't applicable to Mustang since it uses CCS.
 

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Ford's site says on a 150 kw charger, you can fill 47 miles in 10 minutes. So 42 minutes to fill 200 miles worth. At 89 cents/minute, that $37. Woah!
This rate is not a guarantee. Charging rate is dependent on outside temp, battery temp, current battery state of charge (SOC).
 

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Ford's site says on a 150 kw charger, you can fill 47 miles in 10 minutes. So 42 minutes to fill 200 miles worth. At 89 cents/minute, that $37. Woah!
Using your 3.5 miles/kWh means adding 47 miles in 10 minutes means charging at a rate of 80kW, which is much slower than 150. I guess we'll have to wait for the charging curves to see what's really going on and how much it will cost.
 

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Using your 3.5 miles/kWh means adding 47 miles in 10 minutes means charging at a rate of 80kW, which is much slower than 150. I guess we'll have to wait for the charging curves to see what's really going on and how much it will cost.
The 3.5 miles/kWh is the (approximate) driving discharge rate, not the charge rate. Those are unrelated, aren't they?
 

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OK, A lot of confusion here. We presently drive a 2019 Leaf Plus. The other day we took a an extended shopping trip and I had to stop and charge at a EvGO public charger while we were in a local shopping mall. It took about 35 minutes to go from 17% to 83% charge. That put about 150 miles back in the battery. That charge cost me $10.47. A similar sized gas gar would have cost me about $12 at the gas cost of $2.37 a gallon. You have to remember something here. The public charging stations are there to make money. They are not cheap and you should only use if necessary. It is much cheaper to charge at home at 9 cents a kWh than use a public charger. We have been driving e-vehicles for three years now and I have only used a public charger five or six times. We live in the rural North Georgia mountains so we are about two hours from any large city. If we have to drive downtown (which I hate more than anything) we would probably have to charge using the Nissan Leaf. With the E-Mustang's 300 mile range we would not....one of the reasons we are purchasing one. For all of you new to electric vehicles get out of the mindset of "filling up" at public chargers. You will charge at home 99% of the time. If you figure that the average driver has a commute of 40-50 miles a day you can go a week without charging. I plug in anytime the battery is less than 75% at home.
 

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In addition, in the Georgia area at least...most chargers are ChaDeMo....usually at least 2-3 level 2 chargers at each station also. CCS or Combo chargers are more rare but just about all new cars and charging stations upcoming will have them. I know there are ChaDeMo adapters that Teslas can use....not sure if there is a ChaDeMo to CCS adapter.....would not be hard to do since the top part of the CCS connector is the same as the ChaDeMo plug. All communications take place in that part of the plug. The two big contacts in the bottom of the CCS plug are what carries the DC current.
 

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OK, A lot of confusion here. We presently drive a 2019 Leaf Plus. The other day we took a an extended shopping trip and I had to stop and charge at a EvGO public charger while we were in a local shopping mall. It took about 35 minutes to go from 17% to 83% charge. That put about 150 miles back in the battery. That charge cost me $10.47. A similar sized gas gar would have cost me about $12 at the gas cost of $2.37 a gallon. You have to remember something here. The public charging stations are there to make money. They are not cheap and you should only use if necessary. It is much cheaper to charge at home at 9 cents a kWh than use a public charger. We have been driving e-vehicles for three years now and I have only used a public charger five or six times. We live in the rural North Georgia mountains so we are about two hours from any large city. If we have to drive downtown (which I hate more than anything) we would probably have to charge using the Nissan Leaf. With the E-Mustang's 300 mile range we would not....one of the reasons we are purchasing one. For all of you new to electric vehicles get out of the mindset of "filling up" at public chargers. You will charge at home 99% of the time. If you figure that the average driver has a commute of 40-50 miles a day you can go a week without charging. I plug in anytime the battery is less than 75% at home.
Oh no doubt, one shouldn't be getting a BEV if they need to charge it at a commercial charging station most of the time. Makes far more sense to just stick with an ICE vehicle in that situation. That's why BEVs will probably never reach more than maybe 50% market penetration IMO. They're great as a 2nd vehicle in a house, IF you have a private/dedicated place to charge overnight (typically a garage). But they're not generally a good fit for someone that lives in an apartment with a shared parking lot without a guaranteed, dedicated charging port.

Ours will be the 2nd vehicle in our home (with garage). We can always take the Escape instead on road trips, and probably will. But at the same time, all the new tech and features in something like the Mach-e would make it fun to drive on a trip IF the public charging worked well enough. That's what I was trying to figure out.
 

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I personally talked to EA. I spent about an hour talking and doing math. The chargers for all models but Tesla are the same. The charger itself determines the speed at which you charge depending on a lot of factors like battery age weather and what the speed the car will allow. I said ok let’s figure this on a service contract that is $4.00 per month. This reduces the cost of the fill up. The average car fills up at 9 miles per minute at a cost of 0.69 and 1.00 fee. Doing the math 270 miles cost about $21-25.00. My 2017 Fusion AWD Sport gets 25 mph on the highway. In california $3.75 per gallon it is nearly half the price for electric. My goal is to be nothing but electric. It is a completely different mind set. The REAL savings is NOT cost of gas versus electric but rather the amount of miles you drive before you no longer trust the car to drive because of high mileage and the cost of maintenance on a high mileage car. Electric cars have a much different concept. Tesla states that they think there cars will go between 500,000 to 1 mil miles. Ford has no idea but have been doing hybrid electric cars for years and are estimating 250,000 to 500,000
 

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I personally talked to EA. I spent about an hour talking and doing math. The chargers for all models but Tesla are the same. The charger itself determines the speed at which you charge depending on a lot of factors like battery age weather and what the speed the car will allow. I said ok let’s figure this on a service contract that is $4.00 per month. This reduces the cost of the fill up. The average car fills up at 9 miles per minute at a cost of 0.69 and 1.00 fee. Doing the math 270 miles cost about $21-25.00. My 2017 Fusion AWD Sport gets 25 mph on the highway. In california $3.75 per gallon it is nearly half the price for electric. My goal is to be nothing but electric. It is a completely different mind set. The REAL savings is NOT cost of gas versus electric but rather the amount of miles you drive before you no longer trust the car to drive because of high mileage and the cost of maintenance on a high mileage car. Electric cars have a much different concept. Tesla states that they think there cars will go between 500,000 to 1 mil miles. Ford has no idea but have been doing hybrid electric cars for years and are estimating 250,000 to 500,000
This is what we discussed earlier today. That "9 miles per minute" charge speed is too high. The PodPoint link you posted even confirmed that roughly 5 miles/minute (300 miles/hour) is the approximate charging speed @ 150kW. And that's in the ballpark of Ford's specs of 4.7 miles/minute (or 47 miles in 10 minutes, as they put it). 270 miles would take 57 minutes at that speed (x $0.69 = $39).
 
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