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Electrify America will be moving to pay by kWh pricing, according to InsideEVs. They were able to get the news straight from the mouth of Electrify America's President and CEO, Giovanni Palazzo.


The departure from their current pay-by-time model was undoubtedly inspired by California's decision to require EV charging stations to charge according to the amount of energy given to the vehicle, and not by how long the car was connected to the charging station.

The California legislation applies to all newly-installed Level 2 chargers beginning in 2021, and to new DC fast chargers beginning in 2023. Chargers installed before 2021 can continue to use time-based billing until 2031 (for Level 2 chargers) or 2033 (for DC fast chargers).

"We totally believe this is the right decision and we don't want to wait until 2023. We're going to implement this well ahead of 2023" - Electrify America CEO Giovanni Palazzo on transitioning from a time-based charging method to kWh based

However, Electrify America isn't going to wait until 2023. They have decided that the pay-by-kWh is a more fair method, and promise to make the switch well before 2023. Palazzo wouldn't offer an exact date but stressed that he's completely on board with the transition, and would have likely come to this conclusion even if California hadn't mandated it.

"We embrace this. When we started out as a new organization we believed that a tier-based policy would help. At the time, we were the only ones bringing out 150 kW and 350 kW stations... kWh based pricing is our future. We want to make it right and we want to make it simple" - Giovanni Palazzo

Palazzo explained that some states won't allow kWh-based pricing because they don't allow entities to resell electricity. In those states, Electrify America will continue to sell "time" on their charging station. This is most likely why Electrify America started out with the pay-by-time pricing structure because they wanted to have one pricing scheme everywhere.

Palazzo said that the company will offer the pay-by-kWh pricing wherever they are allowed to, and only stick with the time-based pricing in states where charging by the kWh isn't allowed.
 

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Thanks for posting! Very informative. $.24 per KWH for 98 KW, long range battery, equates to $23.52 for 280 miles or expected range or $.0840 per mile.

With regular gas at about $2.00 a gallon, a car like a Ford Escape that gets about 28 mpg, to drive 280 miles, would take 10 gallons, or about $20.00 of gas. Of course the Escape has a 15.8 gallon tank so the range is over 400miles. miles.

I was hoping that "Apples to Apples" the MachE would be significantly less to operate than an ICE, but that turned out not to be true.

So we are getting the MachE not to save money, it cost almost $30,000 more than the Escape, but for the experience of driving an EV, the performance and to help the environment.

Going forward, for BEV to be competitive with mainstream ICE, either the range of the batteries must be extended, or the price of electricity must be reduced. I do not thing the latter will happen, so battery range must improve.

To many people on a budget, and in reality most Americans are, an EV that cost almost double what an ICE costs, is not a viable option.
 

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I was hoping that "Apples to Apples" the MachE would be significantly less to operate than an ICE, but that turned out not to be true.

So we are getting the MachE not to save money, it cost almost $30,000 more than the Escape, but for the experience of driving an EV, the performance and to help the environment.

Going forward, for BEV to be competitive with mainstream ICE, either the range of the batteries must be extended, or the price of electricity must be reduced. I do not thing the latter will happen, so battery range must improve.

To many people on a budget, and in reality most Americans are, an EV that cost almost double what an ICE costs, is not a viable option.
Two things to remember when comparing the full cost of the apples:
1) Most BEV users primarily charge at home at a much lower cost
2) BEVs have much lower maintenance and repair costs than ICEs
 

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My rate per KWH is $.22 slightly less than $.24 that Electrify America is charging. Keep in mind the extra cost of installing a home charger.

For the first 36,000 miles or 3 years, when everything is under warranty: the only additional expense of an ICE over a EV is the oil change and filter: every 7,500 miles, for a cost of less than $50 per oil change and filter.

Transmissions are now warranted to 100,000 miles. So the only additional expense after 50/60,000 miles will be savings on brake replacement, with regenerative braking brakes on an EV brakes should last longer and engine repairs.

Complete brake job is under $300.

Even if you had to replace an entire engine at $5,000 that is a fraction of the additional cost of the MachE vs. Escape.

Again, the underlying reason to get the MachE is the driving experience, new cutting edge technology and helping the environment.

But the MachE wlll not save you money!
 

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Again, the underlying reason to get the MachE is the driving experience, new cutting edge technology and helping the environment.

But the MachE wlll not save you money!
Agree with everything you said, with one hopeful exception: as renewables get better and gain more market share, the costs per kWh should decrease from economies of scale and more efficient designs. On the flipside, the actual cost of gas is far more than the price at the pump. The bigger cost related to ICE vehicles that is hard to put a "real" number on is the carbon impact. For example, what kind of economic damage will be wrought when current fertile and productive farmland is no longer viable? What happens when rising sea levels and storms obliterate billions of dollars worth of prime ocean front real estate? Farmers in many regions of the US and residents of cities like Miami can see the beginning stages of those today.
 

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Thanks for posting! Very informative. $.24 per KWH for 98 KW, long range battery, equates to $23.52 for 280 miles or expected range or $.0840 per mile.

With regular gas at about $2.00 a gallon, a car like a Ford Escape that gets about 28 mpg, to drive 280 miles, would take 10 gallons, or about $20.00 of gas. Of course the Escape has a 15.8 gallon tank so the range is over 400miles. miles.

I was hoping that "Apples to Apples" the MachE would be significantly less to operate than an ICE, but that turned out not to be true.

So we are getting the MachE not to save money, it cost almost $30,000 more than the Escape, but for the experience of driving an EV, the performance and to help the environment.

Going forward, for BEV to be competitive with mainstream ICE, either the range of the batteries must be extended, or the price of electricity must be reduced. I do not thing the latter will happen, so battery range must improve.

To many people on a budget, and in reality most Americans are, an EV that cost almost double what an ICE costs, is not a viable option.
But your "fuel" cost per mile is close to ZERO if you produce your own electricity by installing solar power. Savings on driving and savings for home electricity. Also even better for environment when you are not using electricity produced by fossil fuels. I understand this only works if you have the ability to install, but this makes a huge difference.
 

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I agree with you: as technology bets better the miles per KWH should improve.

I am getting either the Tesla Model Y or the MachE, my preference is the Mustang and that is why I have a confirmed reservation on the First Edition, because I want to my part in helping the environment.

You are 1000% correct: the damage to our planet by burning fossil fuels is not hundred of billions but hundred of trillions of dollars each and every year.

Even though I am approaching 76 years of age, I have children and grandchildren and I want to leave them the best world possible.
 

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My rate per KWH is $.22 slightly less than $.24 that Electrify America is charging. Keep in mind the extra cost of installing a home charger.
Please note, you're now comparing Washington apples with New York apples. The article says:
"While we think this is great news, we'll have to wait to see what the cost structure is. If it's $.50 per kWh, then this isn't exactly good news, right? In my most recent charging session on the network, I paid $12.42 to charge a 2020 Chevy Bolt to 80% and took in 51 kWh of energy. That comes out to about 24 cents per kWh. That's not bad considering the residential cost for electricity is about 17 cents per kWh where the charging station is located."

So, while their EA cost was ~24¢ per kW (not kWh as stated in article), that was in a location where the electrical cost is ~17¢ per kW. If you are paying ~22¢ then your EA cost may be more like 29¢. As they say in the fine print, your cost may vary.

I'm not debating your point of whether the Mustang is a money saver, just pointing out you need to get all the cost differences to do a proper comparison. You also have to look at full life cycle costs for the length you tend to keep vehicles.

My reason for driving electric is to reduce my carbon footprint. My reasons for replacing my Leaf with a Mustang Mach E include fun and performance, plus demonstrating that driving electric can mean fun and performance.
 

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Nevada Power offers a special rate of approx. .05 with proof of registration on EVs and PHEVs from 2201 to 0800hrs. and all weekend, this rate applies to all residential electricity during that time.
 

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When comparing ICE-vs-EV costs, everyone seems to forget that 90% of charging is done at home, and NOT on the road. But apartment dwellers do need to do the math (unless you live in California, where all newly-constructed apartments have to have charging stations). I'm getting a GT, because I'll rarely have to charge on the road.
 
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