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It also depends on what you drive.
Believe it or not, the US national average age of registered cars is over 11 years, so you can expect the average consumer mileage of 22 mpg (possibly less). That equates to the average consumer paying .10¢ a mile. I wouldn’t be surprised if such averages are what’s used in the new Electrify America pricing structure.

That said, and to the points made above, the typical EV buyer is well-off enough to own a home, and most likely have a vehicle (or multiple vehicles) no more 3-5 years old. If properly targeting the cost based on the majority of current EV buyers, the rate per kWh has to come down a bit for price-parity.

For true EV adaption in the US, the actual cost of the vehicle has to have price-parity. All the EVs coming out are just too costly for the average consumer in the US. The 2019 median individual income was $43,206. So, for 50% of all Americans, one year gross salary is less than the starting MMe MSRP. The averaged 2019 individual income was $62,518, equal to the MMe GT MSRP. And the Mach-e is far from the most expensive EV coming to market.

I am glad EA made the steps so far to help bring down EV ownership costs. But the industry as a whole has to do more.

PS- I apologize for the statistics storm. I hope all of you are having a wonderful day.
One other very important factor in the future of EVs is electricity availability and cost. Recently California because of rolling blackouts reversed a ruling and is allowing four older natural gas powered generating plants to remain open. I'm not commenting on renewable vs. fossil, simply that the entire electrical grid isn't keeping up with demand and will continue to be problematic with additional usage. If the most populous State in the USA can't keep AirCons running during a heatwave think about when a larger percentage of the 15.1 million automobiles registered in that State are EVs. Nuke plants four to five years and Solar five to six years to online. Wind three years but are expensive, noisy, land intensive and like solar not always a viable alternative. Once again this post is NOT about the benefits vs. disadvantages of any type of electrical generating plants simply the decision to make a decision (by those who are in a position to do so) that is critically becoming more time sensitive and on a cost basis that people are willing to pay to plug in.
PS: Anyone with Netflix, David Attenborough's most recent documentary, "A Life on Our Planet" is visually beautiful, thought provoking, and not political.
 

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Notice anything on the EA map for North Central US? There are NO stations for 4 states and nothing north of I-80 except for one in Minnesota. How are dealers supposed to sell anything but local city BEV'S with that infrastructure. It doesn't matter what the pricing structure is if there are no stations. Maybe it is “Build it and they will come” but how are private companies supposed to justify a ROI in any area of low population density. So who funds the build out for these areas? I give Tesla credit for realizing that they would not sell BEV's if they did not fund an infrastructure. Now if only Tesla would allow us to hook up our MME's to their supercharger stations. It will be a long time before ICE vehicles disappear. I see Hybrids existing for many decades.
 

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Notice anything on the EA map for North Central US? There are NO stations for 4 states and nothing north of I-80 except for one in Minnesota. How are dealers supposed to sell anything but local city BEV'S with that infrastructure. It doesn't matter what the pricing structure is if there are no stations. Maybe it is “Build it and they will come” but how are private companies supposed to justify a ROI in any area of low population density. So who funds the build out for these areas? I give Tesla credit for realizing that they would not sell BEV's if they did not fund an infrastructure. Now if only Tesla would allow us to hook up our MME's to their supercharger stations. It will be a long time before ICE vehicles disappear. I see Hybrids existing for many decades.
I couldn't agree more. While I am very fortunate to be on the I-15/I-70 route there should be a 'plan' for the same people who bought VW Diesels in the I-80 areas. At the minimum put out some info.
 

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Notice anything on the EA map for North Central US? There are NO stations for 4 states and nothing north of I-80 except for one in Minnesota. How are dealers supposed to sell anything but local city BEV'S with that infrastructure. It doesn't matter what the pricing structure is if there are no stations. Maybe it is “Build it and they will come” but how are private companies supposed to justify a ROI in any area of low population density. So who funds the build out for these areas? I give Tesla credit for realizing that they would not sell BEV's if they did not fund an infrastructure. Now if only Tesla would allow us to hook up our MME's to their supercharger stations. It will be a long time before ICE vehicles disappear. I see Hybrids existing for many decades.
So we're looking at a map of the EA network. They are not the only EV charging network in the USA.I've got 6 different network apps on my phone. A look at the ChargePoint North Central USA:
 

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So we're looking at a map of the EA network. They are not the only EV charging network in the USA.I've got 6 different network apps on my phone. A look at the ChargePoint North Central USA:
From the map, Wyoming, Montana, North and South Dakota total of 15 combine that with the 3 EA stations in Montana makes grand total of 18.

Of course the population of those states are small, but basically it would be an adventure to say the least to travel in those states in an EV.

.
 

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So we're looking at a map of the EA network. They are not the only EV charging network in the USA.I've got 6 different network apps on my phone. A look at the ChargePoint North Central USA:
Yes but:
My daughter and friend recently took a trip by car to the Pacific coast (driving rather than flying due to covid). To maximize the amount of time at scenic sites they decided to do the the first day Twin Cities, Minnesota to Whitefish, Montana 1250 miles in one 18 hr day by Lexus RX-350. The route was I-94. I see no Fast Charge stations above 62 kw in ND & MT and then only one per site. Will it be working when you get there? I see no fast charge stations in Montana until you get to the western edge of Montana. I have only done a cursory search with charge point and plug share apps. Maybe the first 1250 miles could be done in 3 days with destination chargers at motels with a BEV. Maybe the MME charger finder will tell us upfront to pick a different route??

What I am saying is BEV travel is totally impractical in this area with the current infrastructure in the US at present. Yes, if you are retired and like doing 400 miles per day it works. For working people with limited vacation a BEV does not work well. For my own needs I am fine with the MME, but we have a long way to go before BEV's are the norm.
 

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One other very important factor in the future of EVs is electricity availability and cost. Recently California because of rolling blackouts reversed a ruling and is allowing four older natural gas powered generating plants to remain open. I'm not commenting on renewable vs. fossil, simply that the entire electrical grid isn't keeping up with demand and will continue to be problematic with additional usage. If the most populous State in the USA can't keep AirCons running during a heatwave think about when a larger percentage of the 15.1 million automobiles registered in that State are EVs. Nuke plants four to five years and Solar five to six years to online. Wind three years but are expensive, noisy, land intensive and like solar not always a viable alternative. Once again this post is NOT about the benefits vs. disadvantages of any type of electrical generating plants simply the decision to make a decision (by those who are in a position to do so) that is critically becoming more time sensitive and on a cost basis that people are willing to pay to plug in.
PS: Anyone with Netflix, David Attenborough's most recent documentary, "A Life on Our Planet" is visually beautiful, thought provoking, and not political.
Bob - your points are all valid, but if you don't set a goal you will never reach it. We are talking 15 years from now and while that will come quickly, it still gives the system a goal to try and reach and a timeline in which to accomplish.
 
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