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Do you think the Mach E will be a Tesla Model Y competitor?
Or more of a Model X competitor. The X is pretty huge and expensive.

The Model Y gets a 280 mile range and 0-60 in 3.5 seconds. Does anyone know the price of the Model Y yet? I think the best guess Ive seen is around $48,000. Although you won't get that range or speed for $48k.
 

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On Telsa's website they distinguish how much the Model Y will cost with and without incentives/gas savings.

Tesla Model Y RWD Long Range - $48,000 purchase price and $43,700 with incentives
Tesla Model Y AWD Long Range - $52,000 purchase price and $47,700 with incentives
Tesla Model Y AWD Performance - $61,000 purchase price and $56,800 with incentives

So with that being said, if Ford is able to keep the Mach E's starting price at around $40,000 without factoring in incentives, it'll have a big advantage on the Model Y.

I don't see the Mach E as a Model X competitor, they're too different in size and price. Who knows Ford probably has a plan to build a larger electric SUV like the Model X.
 

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So based on last night's leaks, I am curious what people think about the Mach E compared to the Model Y.

One thing that is kind of disappointing is there is no mid-level performance tier. The Model Y's Long Range AWD model has a 4.8 0-60 (not sure if this takes into account recent software updates which supposedly improve by performance about 5%) and a 280 mile range, compared to the Mach E First Edition that is essentially $52,400 (after tax credit) and has a 5.5 0-60 and a 270 mile range. I know there are other factors in play, but just interesting to see initial numbers in play.

However, comparing the GT Mach E to the Performance Model Y makes it a little more interesting. The Mach E GT has a 3.5 0-60 and a 235-250 mile range for $53k (after tax credit) while the performance Model Y has a 3.5 0-60 and a 280 mile range for $61k.
 

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Do we have a sense of whether the Mach-E will have a third row option like the Tesla Model Y? The video of the 5 adults in the test vehicle made it look pretty snug in terms of cabin space, and I can't see how you'd get a third row in with the rake of that hatch. Maybe the better comparison is with the Tesla Model 3.
 

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Tesla Y will not get any federal tax credit. Mach E has a $7,500 advantage there.
 

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True, though Ford will reach the 200k production limit to begin the federal tax credit phase-out in less than 85,000 additional EV sales. So maybe early 2021 if the Mach-E is popular on launch? After that, the Mach-E starts to look pretty expensive for what it offers...
 

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True, though Ford will reach the 200k production limit to begin the federal tax credit phase-out in less than 85,000 additional EV sales. So maybe early 2021 if the Mach-E is popular on launch? After that, the Mach-E starts to look pretty expensive for what it offers...
I think the only cheaper route might be with a cheaper electric vehicle that sits under the Mach-E.
 

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Did anyone catch any towing capacity for the Mach E?

M

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I'm actively looking for Mach-E towing capacity information to no avail so far.
Have a small boat I tow up to the cottage and back quite a few times when cool-to-warm conditions hit and old man winter goes away. So its a must. I'll keep you posted.

For now I expect it to be within range of the Model Y:
"Since it's an SUV, there may be modest trailer-tow capabilities, possibly 1,500 pounds or 2,000 pounds (Class 1), maybe 3,500 pounds (Class 3). A handful of compact SUVs can tow 3,500 or even 4,000 pounds."
 

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If you log onto the UK Ford website the towing capacity of the Ford Mach E is listed as 750kg (about 1600lbs). The Tesla Model 3 in the UK has a towing capacity of 910kg (about 2000lbs). Wonder what the Tesla Model Y will come in as?
 

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I'm actively looking for Mach-E towing capacity information to no avail so far.
Have a small boat I tow up to the cottage and back quite a few times when cool-to-warm conditions hit and old man winter goes away. So its a must. I'll keep you posted.

For now I expect it to be within range of the Model Y:
"Since it's an SUV, there may be modest trailer-tow capabilities, possibly 1,500 pounds or 2,000 pounds (Class 1), maybe 3,500 pounds (Class 3). A handful of compact SUVs can tow 3,500 or even 4,000 pounds."
Tow 13 ft Boston Whaler with my Bolt , starting 3rd year of faithful flawless service.
Whatever Ford specs end up stating the Mach E could also work for small tows. Not so much about the drive system as it is the hitch attachment point and tongue weight.
 

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The EPA released the range number for the Model Y Performance AWD and according to them it will get 315 miles of range.

The Model Y also receives an official efficiency rating of 121 MPGe for combined city and highway driving (129 MPGe in the city and 112 MPGe on the highway).

Tesla Model Y Range
 

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To me, the Model Y's most significant advantage is the Supercharger network, now widely built out across the world, that none of our Mach E will be able to use for road trips or fast recharging. IONITY in Europe and Electrify America here in the US are mitigating that concern, rapidly, as they expand their Level 3 DC fast charging networks, but nonetheless the Tesla still has a huge advantage. Not only can the Tesla charge at the Superchargers, it can also take advantage of all of these new IONITY and Electrify America stations and charge at ALL of them.

Now the counterpoint is how often do you actually use these types of chargers? I don't anticipate often, so this type of concern is mostly a concern on paper and not one that bears any meaningful relationship to using the car in the real world. Charge at home every night and you're mostly set. If you can top off at work you are even more set.
 

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Not only can the Tesla charge at the Superchargers, it can also take advantage of all of these new IONITY and Electrify America stations and charge at ALL of them.
Yes, but... North American Teslas can only DC fast charge from Tesla Superchargers and from CHAdeMO plugs, and the latter only if the driver purchased Tesla's $450 CHAdeMO adapter, right? It seems like the EA stations are putting in a smaller number of CHAdeMO "pumps" at their stations, typically just 1, and limited to 50 kW power. Right?

It's still considered a fast charge, and still will be very important for certain trips. Just wanted to point out that it's not all pumps at all stations.

Now the counterpoint is how often do you actually use these types of chargers?
I don't have a BEV yet. My current prediction is that I'll use DC FC maybe two trips per year at most. For all but basic city to city day trips, I'd most likely have to rent an ICE vehicle.
 

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To me, the Model Y's most significant advantage is the Supercharger network, now widely built out across the world, that none of our Mach E will be able to use for road trips or fast recharging. IONITY in Europe and Electrify America here in the US are mitigating that concern, rapidly, as they expand their Level 3 DC fast charging networks, but nonetheless the Tesla still has a huge advantage. Not only can the Tesla charge at the Superchargers, it can also take advantage of all of these new IONITY and Electrify America stations and charge at ALL of them.

Now the counterpoint is how often do you actually use these types of chargers? I don't anticipate often, so this type of concern is mostly a concern on paper and not one that bears any meaningful relationship to using the car in the real world. Charge at home every night and you're mostly set. If you can top off at work you are even more set.
That's my thoughts. Only drive I "consistently" make is Wichita to KC (my sister lives there). Even that is only make 2-3 times a year. It's a little under 200 miles and the KS turnpike recently put in free DC fast chargers at the rest stops. So with an ER AWD I can make it up there without charging and just have to charge to come back. There is actually only 1 supercharger on that route and it's actually a little ways out of the way to get to it.

So for me, the supercharger network is a pretty meh benefit. If I end up doing it more often I'll likely just talk my sister into getting a 240 outlet installed in her garage :).
 
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