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2021 Mach-E GT, Grabber Blue
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I don't own a multimeter but I am guessing if I have my headlights on and plug in the car I should see an increase in brightness if it does charge the 12V battery at the same time as the high voltage one, although maybe LED lights might not work the same way so not conclusive. But if they brighten it might be.
Unfortunately, LED headlights are a whole different animal than incandescent bulbs. Diodes have a very non-linear response to voltage, and the headlights are actually pulse-width driven (point your cellphone camera at your lights in video mode and you probably will see them flickering), so there's a bit more going on there besides very good voltage current regulation.

If you are getting this fault with near regular daily driving, I'd continue to press your dealer or Ford for resolution. If this is from the car sitting for extended periods of time in the cold, then it may be an outlier condition that hasn't yet been taken into consideration in the monitoring logic of the software. Although a remote possibility, it's also possible that you just have a defective lead-acid battery. You can ask the dealer (or a chain auto parts store) to do a load test on it (a very simple check that can be done in under a minute) if they haven't already. If it's weak or fails, warranty should cover it.

I can share some of your sentiment, there's a lot of information available that isn't readily brought out through the UI. I need to do some exploring with an OBDII adapter when time permits.
 

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2021 Mustang Mach e Select AWD
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I live in a condo where I don’t have a personal parking space so even a L1 plug isn’t an option . The majority or at least a very substantial amount of auto owners are in the same situation. it’s early in this EV transition but I really hope that Ford and others adapt with reasonable solutions. I am surprised they didn’t prepare for extreme cold weather. Right note I’m at a free charge spot eating dinner so it ain’t all that bad.
I live in SW Ontario across the river from Port Huron Michigan so I am also experiencing some of the cold that you would get in Chicago. I don't have a heated garage, in fact I have been parking my Mach e outside, but I do have a home power supply. I normally leave the vehicle plugged in when prompted due to temperature and so far I have had no problems.
Over the holidays I lent the Mach e to my son to use for a week. He really wants an EV and is leaning towards Tesla, although he loves the Mach. I thought this would be a good trial for him since, like you he does not have a home power supply (although he has a heated garage for his building). During the week he racked up quite a few kilometres with lots of highway driving and using commercial fast charge stations almost exclusively. He called me at least a couple of times totally frustrated with charge stations that did not work and him having to deal with a new search. To wrap up my story, he has decided that he can't realistically move to an EV without his own power supply and or more reliability/availability of commercial options. He will no doubt get his EV but for now will be content coming home to steal the Mach to get his fix.
 

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I live in SW Ontario across the river from Port Huron Michigan so I am also experiencing some of the cold that you would get in Chicago. I don't have a heated garage, in fact I have been parking my Mach e outside, but I do have a home power supply. I normally leave the vehicle plugged in when prompted due to temperature and so far I have had no problems.
Over the holidays I lent the Mach e to my son to use for a week. He really wants an EV and is leaning towards Tesla, although he loves the Mach. I thought this would be a good trial for him since, like you he does not have a home power supply (although he has a heated garage for his building). During the week he racked up quite a few kilometres with lots of highway driving and using commercial fast charge stations almost exclusively. He called me at least a couple of times totally frustrated with charge stations that did not work and him having to deal with a new search. To wrap up my story, he has decided that he can't realistically move to an EV without his own power supply and or more reliability/availability of commercial options. He will no doubt get his EV but for now will be content coming home to steal the Mach to get his fix.
“Over the holidays I lent the Mach e to my son to use for a week.”

Brave man!
 

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I live in a condo where I don’t have a personal parking space so even a L1 plug isn’t an option . The majority or at least a very substantial amount of auto owners are in the same situation. it’s early in this EV transition but I really hope that Ford and others adapt with reasonable solutions. I am surprised they didn’t prepare for extreme cold weather. Right note I’m at a free charge spot eating dinner so it ain’t all that bad.
I too applaud your decision. My conscience (and a love for cars and tech) caused me to go EV, and as a Ford fan the MME was the only choice for me. I also applaud Ford for democratizing EVs by electrifying three iconic brands. However, you’re right about the charging Infrasturcutre. My first trip with the MME was 400 miles into the mountains of New England and it was a bit ‘chargers’ harrowing. I think it comes down to a push by municipal governments for more funding for charging stations as well. New Jersey has one of the most aggressive programs for public charging stations installs (at hotels, restaurants, etc.). Thanks for sharing your thoughts!!!
 

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And its really a shame the owners don't have access to critical raw data like low voltage readings and journey summaries with actual efficiency averages. I wish they would offer data analytical tools that you could download into spreadsheet based tools.
Someone on the forum posted, who had issues with the 12v (early deliveries had a major issue which was apparently addressed in software update). He mentioned using a plug in meter to check the status of your 12v battery, it plugs into the accessory port and you can do a check to see if you're actually having an issue with low voltage on the 12v. Here's a link to a selection, as I don't recall the specific one he got. It just seems odd that since the 12v battery slaves off the main battery that the car should EVER have a low 12v battery unless the main battery is at exceedingly low charge. https://www.amazon.com/s?k=12+v+plu...efix=12+v+plug+in+meter,aps,80&ref=nb_sb_noss
 

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I posted this somewhere else as well, sorry for the repeat. It was 6 degrees in the garage yesterday morning. Obviously, I don't heat my garage and I have/had no problem with pre-conditioning. I set the cabin temp for 66 degrees.
 

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This car has been engineered for the people fortunate enough to have heated garages or that live in a warm year-round climate. I just got a 12 battery fault and found out that many owners also received the same warning. It is because my car is parked in a non-heated garage and I don't have a dedicated charger where it can stay plugged in. Now I have to go out in the cold to drive my car around to charge the battery from what the dealer told me. It has been below 20ºF here in Chicago for over a day. When I do drive the car I get about 1 mile/kWh that gives my car about 100 miles on a full charge.

Everything is written and geared to the garage owners and personal charging stations. If you don't have this, I would not suggest buying the car unless you are willing to have a fair-weather car.
Have you had the service software update? Have them check the fault codes.
 

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This situation seems to point to an opportunity lost in the land development business. I did a drive through of a new very large apartment/condo complex. Some folks can have a garage and most do not. Spotted a couple of Tesla's and a Leaf in the parking lot. Missing was any kind of communal L2 charging. At an office building a few hundred yards down the road were about 8 L2 chargers. Could be wrong but asking myself the question "would I pay a premium/fee or something to charge my car in my complex?" My answer was "yes I would." Purchased a new home in 2019 from a large national builder and stated from the get go I wanted to be able to charge an EV. Best I could do was a NEMA 14-30 in the garage. And the house has 200 AMP service. I think it generous to say that the home construction industry is unimaginative at best with respect to EV's and potential buyers. (I did add a NEMA 14-50 myself later did not need to but I have 2 EV's). I would guess there is some opportunity for the large branded EVSE providers to come into a apartment/condo complex and install equipment. Wonder if these different players will get a clue?
 

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This car has been engineered for the people fortunate enough to have heated garages or that live in a warm year-round climate. I just got a 12 battery fault and found out that many owners also received the same warning. It is because my car is parked in a non-heated garage and I don't have a dedicated charger where it can stay plugged in. Now I have to go out in the cold to drive my car around to charge the battery from what the dealer told me. It has been below 20ºF here in Chicago for over a day. When I do drive the car I get about 1 mile/kWh that gives my car about 100 miles on a full charge.

Everything is written and geared to the garage owners and personal charging stations. If you don't have this, I would not suggest buying the car unless you are willing to have a fair-weather car.
This car has been engineered for the people fortunate enough to have heated garages or that live in a warm year-round climate. I just got a 12 battery fault and found out that many owners also received the same warning. It is because my car is parked in a non-heated garage and I don't have a dedicated charger where it can stay plugged in. Now I have to go out in the cold to drive my car around to charge the battery from what the dealer told me. It has been below 20ºF here in Chicago for over a day. When I do drive the car I get about 1 mile/kWh that gives my car about 100 miles on a full charge.

Everything is written and geared to the garage owners and personal charging stations. If you don't have this, I would not suggest buying the car unless you are willing to have a fair-weather car.
The battery is temperature controlled (
) If you are seeing 1mi/KWH, there is probably something else wrong with the car. Have the dealer check the software fault codes. There is a service software update which my car needed (I got it Nov 1). This has do be done by the service department. The 12V battery fault message may be a software issue.
 

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To answer your questions:
- No, I am not with Ford, but I am an Electrical Engineer that enjoys taking deep technical dives into things. The information about the software bug has been published on the web, but it only affects very early models. I'm sorry, but I don't know specifics, but very roughly if your vehicle was built after June 2021, then you shouldn't be affected. If you are, it's a simple software update.

- Yes, pressing start on the FordPass app will have the same effect. However, you are only allowed to remote start the vehicle two times before you need to locally start it.

- I haven't tested whether the 12V battery is supplied power when the charging cable is connected, however the later software does initiate a power transfer whenever the 12V battery voltage is sensed to be below a certain threshold, regardless of the vehicle operating state. In place of an alternator, a DC to DC converter is used to replenish the 12VDC system. The converter takes power from the high voltage battery bus and converts it to low voltage DC (~12V) that is suitable for running all of the vehicle's lights and conventional electrical accessories (excluding the E-heat and A/C compressor).

The easiest way to check whether the 12V battery is receiving charge is to put a multimeter on the passenger compartment fuse block and monitor voltage. Nominal battery voltage is 12.6 - 12.8 volts. When the DC to DC converter is active, the bus voltage rises to 13.5 - 14.2 volts, very similar to what you would expect to see in an ICE vehicle with its alternator operating. (Note: Cigarette plug voltmeters are essentially useless, because the plugs are all switched with the accessory power, and the DC to DC converter also activates when the accessory power is turned on).

- All glass attenuates light to some degree, but a battery maintainer on the dashboard is there to maintain state of charge, not recharge things, so as long as it gets some sunlight across the whole panel, it will work (and works well for ICE cars left for a few weeks in a surface lot at an airport). In truth, it would be better to get to the bottom of the issue of why the 12V battery is not being maintained automatically by the vehicle.
I received my Mach-E Nov 1. The dealer checked the software fault status yesterday and the car needed a service software update. (You can't do this at home) If there are problems, have the dealer check the fault log. For testing or jumping the 12V battery, there is a small port on the left side of the front bumper behind which are cables connecting to the 12 V battery.
 

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Thanks. I am trying to push Ford, and the industry for solutions and a tone of disappointment is hard not to keep hidden. EVs are a huge nationwide push to try and solve our energy dependence on fossil fuels. To do this the electric vehicles with the ability to charge them must be available to a much wider public than just those that can charge at home. I do not intend to sell my car. I intend to learn how to best mitigate these problems as they arise and share solutions with other owners. I meet many owners of other EVs in charging areas that have the same limitations as I do and they are owning an EV to improve our environment. So best of luck to all of us.
owning a home or garage should not be a pre-requisite for EV buyers. I don’t see Ford putting a caveat that don’t buy if you don’t own a private home. 😊
 

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owning a home or garage should not be a pre-requisite for EV buyers. I don’t see Ford putting a caveat that don’t buy if you don’t own a private home. 😊
I got my Mach-E last January, the second week I had it the 12v battery froze while I was at work ( hospital in StL, outside temp was below zero 3 days in a row). The battery froze up 3 times last winter. Then the first
of October, the 12v battery failed and left me stranded at a shopping center. It took 14 weeks to get a replacement due to supply chain problems.
 

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This car has been engineered for the people fortunate enough to have heated garages or that live in a warm year-round climate. I just got a 12 battery fault and found out that many owners also received the same warning. It is because my car is parked in a non-heated garage and I don't have a dedicated charger where it can stay plugged in. Now I have to go out in the cold to drive my car around to charge the battery from what the dealer told me. It has been below 20ºF here in Chicago for over a day. When I do drive the car I get about 1 mile/kWh that gives my car about 100 miles on a full charge.

Everything is written and geared to the garage owners and personal charging stations. If you don't have this, I would not suggest buying the car unless you are willing to have a fair-weather car.
I just brought my Mach e home to Hawaii. It is 70 degrees +. I still got the 12V Battery Fault MSG. Are the cold temperatures the only issue with this fault?
 

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I just brought my Mach e home to Hawaii. It is 70 degrees +. I still got the 12V Battery Fault MSG. Are the cold temperatures the only issue with this fault?
early on they had a 12v fault caused by a lot of the cars sitting in storage, at rail yards for an extended time, that was supposed to have been sorted with software. If you haven't charged yet, I'd give a try at plugging in and charging the car. Not sure that will make a diff but worth a try.
 

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I just brought my Mach e home to Hawaii. It is 70 degrees +. I still got the 12V Battery Fault MSG. Are the cold temperatures the only issue with this fault?
Did the alert come up as soon as you took it home? If it doesn't go away after charging it you might have to get it checked at a dealer.
 

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I just brought my Mach e home to Hawaii. It is 70 degrees +. I still got the 12V Battery Fault MSG. Are the cold temperatures the only issue with this fault?
What is your build date?
That could help in finding out if your MME was part of the fault 12V battery batch.
 

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This situation seems to point to an opportunity lost in the land development business. I did a drive through of a new very large apartment/condo complex. Some folks can have a garage and most do not. Spotted a couple of Tesla's and a Leaf in the parking lot. Missing was any kind of communal L2 charging. At an office building a few hundred yards down the road were about 8 L2 chargers. Could be wrong but asking myself the question "would I pay a premium/fee or something to charge my car in my complex?" My answer was "yes I would." Purchased a new home in 2019 from a large national builder and stated from the get go I wanted to be able to charge an EV. Best I could do was a NEMA 14-30 in the garage. And the house has 200 AMP service. I think it generous to say that the home construction industry is unimaginative at best with respect to EV's and potential buyers. (I did add a NEMA 14-50 myself later did not need to but I have 2 EV's). I would guess there is some opportunity for the large branded EVSE providers to come into a apartment/condo complex and install equipment. Wonder if these different players will get a clue?
Excellent points.
 

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This car has been engineered for the people fortunate enough to have heated garages or that live in a warm year-round climate. I just got a 12 battery fault and found out that many owners also received the same warning. It is because my car is parked in a non-heated garage and I don't have a dedicated charger where it can stay plugged in. Now I have to go out in the cold to drive my car around to charge the battery from what the dealer told me. It has been below 20ºF here in Chicago for over a day. When I do drive the car I get about 1 mile/kWh that gives my car about 100 miles on a full charge.

Everything is written and geared to the garage owners and personal charging stations. If you don't have this, I would not suggest buying the car unless you are willing to have a fair-weather car.
I am fortunate enough to live in Southern California and have installed a charger in my garage. But I notice when it does get cold (for us), say in the forties, for a few days my range is impacted - lessened. This is a function of the battery chemistry; colder = less range. If you otherwise like the car may suggest you spend the money to install a 220v charging circuit in your garage and then program the car to warm itself up an hour or two before you expect to need to use it. This should warm up the cabin for you and make the batteries warm themselves up because of the charging that will be required while it's getting the cabin ready. I am not an engineer, just my opinion.
 

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I am fortunate enough to live in Southern California and have installed a charger in my garage. But I notice when it does get cold (for us), say in the forties, for a few days my range is impacted - lessened. This is a function of the battery chemistry; colder = less range. If you otherwise like the car may suggest you spend the money to install a 220v charging circuit in your garage and then program the car to warm itself up an hour or two before you expect to need to use it. This should warm up the cabin for you and make the batteries warm themselves up because of the charging that will be required while it's getting the cabin ready. I am not an engineer, just my opinion.
OP does not have a garage or access to any plugs other than public. That and cold climate weather was the whole point of his post.
 

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I couldn't imagine buying an EV when I didn't have a guaranteed way to charge it at home. Seems you are knocking Ford because of a vehicle you do not have the home capabilities that the vehicle is inteded to have. The beauty from your position is the car is in very high demand, and you should not have any issue selling (probably without any loss) should you choose to go that route. Best of luck to you!
I think a summary to Wayne’s information might be, Think about driving through a Chicago neighborhood after a snowstorm and all the cars parked on the streets, how’s that going to work for EVs? Those of us with garages are blessed and attached garages even more blessinged. Wayne, you have my respect,
 
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