Mach-E Forum | Ford Mustang Mach-E Forum and News banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Reserved First Edition Rapid Red Metallic
Joined
·
677 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Our Mustang MachE will come with, at no extra cost, a 32 amp 240/120 volt charger.

Some have said they plan to install a Ford Home Charger, 48 amp hard wired so as to keep the 32 amp in the trunk when they travel.

As I have read the 120 volt charger, 3 miles per hour is basically useless: Overnight charging will be 30 miles.

So the only reason to carry the 32 amp charger is to plug it into a 240 volt outlet with a 40 amp circuit.

Unless you are visiting someone who has a BEV, it is unlikely they will have a 240 volt 40 amp service. If they have a BEV, you can use their charger - you will not need yours.

Isn't it just easier to use a charging/super charging station?

We do not carry extra gas in our car: when we start to run low we pull into a gas station and fill up.

Why would we do differently with a BEV? when we run low, just pull into a charging station?

In other words in real world driving, when do you plan to use the charging that you are carrying in your trunk?

BTW, there are numerous videos on YouTube about long trips being made in Tesla: not one ever mentioned using anything but a charging station. Never a charger they are carrying in their trunk.

I do not see why that would be any different with the MachE.

For those of you who plan to buy a hard wired charging station, to keep the Ford supplied 32 amp in your car, when and how do you anticipate using it? What am I missing?

Just my $.02

Comments welcome!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
355 Posts
Some like to car-camp in BEVs at RV sites. They have NEMA outlets (type varies depending on where you go) so people bring mobile chargers and adapters.

I'm potentially interested in buying a second mobile charger from Ford (or from a third party, depending on costs). I could leave it at my parents' house, or just leave it in the car "just in case" the opportunity arises.
 

·
Registered
Reserved First Edition Rapid Red Metallic
Joined
·
677 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
OK: Thanks!

My wife and I do not RV.

Does your parent's home have a 240 NEMA outlet with 40 amp service? None of my friends do, nor does my ski house.

What I am interested in are "just in case" to justify spending an additional $799 plus potential cost of a 60 amp vs. 40 amp circuit.

If I see some "real world" needs I will go for the hard wired charger: so far I cannot think of any and that is why I said "What am I missing?"

I still think that we will all wind up using chargers/super chargers, never using the charger in our trunk, just as owners of Tesla do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
355 Posts
I don't have an EV yet, so not 100% sure. But so far I am in agreement with you.

Buying a second EVSE is something that would be a luxury for me. And a little peace of mind even though I know that in reality, it'd be very unlikely to ever be required.

Obviously for a planned road trip, it's trivial to just unplug the mobile charger from the garage and pack it for that "just in case" peace of mind.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
355 Posts
No extra outlets in parents' garage, but the load center is on the outside wall of the garage so it would be fairly easy (but not cost free) to add the outlet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
I keep a portable 240v Charger in the trunk of my eGolf. Can't say I've used it enough o justify the cost, but it does add peace of mind. I've installed 14-50 outlets at 3 family members houses to use when I visit as they eventually will have a need. I've also used the crarger with a 10-50 adaptor to plug into a range outlet and threw the cable out the window to charge from an air bnb.

The Mach E has 2-3x the range of my eGolf, so I would think the need is less. But I would still take it on any road trip.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
145 Posts
There have been times I've visited places that should have a level 2 charger, only to find that the charger is down for some reason (usually those operated by Blink). Then I've been able to plug-in to a random wall outlet while I'm there for a few hours. Having the cable in the car is peace of mind, even if you don't really need the power.

The other issue is that it's a hassle to wind and rewind and unwind the cable every time you leave home and return home.
 

·
Registered
Reserved First Edition Rapid Red Metallic
Joined
·
677 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
A random wall socket, 120 volts, for a couple of hours, gives you between 6 and 8 miles.
At least to me that is a poor reason to spend $799 for a hard wired unit.

I agree that winding and unwinding is a hassle and who wants to do that!

But I am trying to find when someone actually is going to use it on the road.

As to peace of mind: I think first you have to have a scenario where you actually will need it. If the event has practically zero chance than, at least to me, there are better ways to spend $799 - just like buying life insurance at the airport before you take a flight. Sure there is a chance, but it is so infinitesimal small, why even bother.

I am beginning to think, that installing a hard wire unit so that you have a charger in the car, considering all the charging/super charging stations, whose number are increasing almost daily, is a waste of money.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
355 Posts
Agree with this argument wherein you're discussing an $800 accessory. But it's not a 2-option decision. There are good options in the $300-$400 range, too. Just sayin'... And yeah, it's still $300-400 that could probably be put to some better use like retirement savings or keeping the spouse happy. Which is why I classify an additional EVSE as a luxury.
 

·
Premium Member
2018 Fusion Energi Burgundy Velvet Platinum
Joined
·
753 Posts
I'll use it "on the road" since my Daughter and two friends while wired for 240 both have Tesla's and as you are aware their cords are proprietary and incompatible. Having said that I had a 50 Amp with an outlet installed in anticipation of my purchasing an EV. I currently charge my PHEV Energi using the Ford Mobile cord on 120V and I anticipate that rolling and unrolling the MMe cord should not be significantly more difficult or time consuming as having rolled and unrolled the Energi cord over the past 2.5 years. The best part of the upcoming process is that Henry Ford the First isn't CEO ("You can get a Ford in any color that you want, as long as it's black") and we as prospective buyers have a myriad of choices to fit out individual needs/wants and desires.
 

·
Registered
2016 Nissan Leaf, 2021 Mustang Mach-E First Edition reserved
Joined
·
967 Posts
A random wall socket, 120 volts, for a couple of hours, gives you between 6 and 8 miles.
At least to me that is a poor reason to spend $799 for a hard wired unit.

I agree that winding and unwinding is a hassle and who wants to do that!

But I am trying to find when someone actually is going to use it on the road.

As to peace of mind: I think first you have to have a scenario where you actually will need it. If the event has practically zero chance than, at least to me, there are better ways to spend $799 - just like buying life insurance at the airport before you take a flight. Sure there is a chance, but it is so infinitesimal small, why even bother.

I am beginning to think, that installing a hard wire unit so that you have a charger in the car, considering all the charging/super charging stations, whose number are increasing almost daily, is a waste of money.
I have actually needed it.

Maryland's eastern shore has very few chargers. In our first road trip in the Leaf we found that the first L3 (DCFC) we intended to hit wasn't working, despite their own app saying it was. We used a nearby L2 to get enough to go to the next L3 on our route. This time we didn't trust the app. We called the company and they checked to make sure it was working. Great. We made it to the next L3 with little range and found it wasn't working after all. We barely limped to our destination, then used the L1 in the car to get some juice while we visited the refuge for a couple of hours. That allowed us to get back to an L2 where we charged for an hour or so, that got us to an L3 that finally worked and got us home.

We also made a trip to a retreat center in NY state. We planned our route and the L3s went just fine, arriving at our destination. We plugged in the L1 and the car was fully charged by the next afternoon.

I almost needed it another time but found an "unlisted" L2 when a detour zapped the battery before reaching my planned L3 stop.
 

·
Registered
Reserved First Edition Rapid Red Metallic
Joined
·
677 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
The Mustang will have almost double the range of your Nissan Leaf.


If I am correct, L1 charging is 3 miles per hour so after 3 hours you will have about 10 miles. That might make a difference in the Leaf, but with the First Edition, which you and I have ordered, with a range of 270 miles, I doubt we will ever let the charge get so low that 10 miles makes a difference.

Finally, if all we are concerned about is L1 charging, it would substantially cheaper to buy a level 1 charger, leave it in the car for emergencies rather than spend $799 for a wired unit and then leave the 32 AMP charger in the car!

I think of a Level 1 charger like a compact spare: to be used in an emergency to get me to a regular charging station.
 

·
Registered
2016 Nissan Leaf, 2021 Mustang Mach-E First Edition reserved
Joined
·
967 Posts
The Mustang will have almost double the range of your Nissan Leaf.
No, our Leaf has the 30 kWh battery. The Mach E will have roughly triple the range.

I think of a Level 1 charger like a compact spare: to be used in an emergency to get me to a regular charging station.
I agree but I think the second applications even more important: destination charger. My example of using it at the retreat center eliminated a stop up and a stop back. This is significant and can change travel plans. At 250 miles, we could theoretically make the trip in the Mach E without stopping but since it's all highway miles, probably not. Using ABRP it says we would only need one 15 minute charge stop -- I'd want that break anyway! We would then arrive with a 10% charge. We were there for a 3 day conference, almost a full charge.

I agree with all the comments above. We have lots of choices in charging the MME. I installed a 32 amp charger for my Leaf because L1 was not enough. We were limited to a 32A charger because we only had 40A space in the electrical panel, so that's no faster than the stock L2 mobile charger that comes with the MME. I could have avoided buying a fixed L2 charger but still would have had to install a 220v outlet. State and Federal rebates covered most of installing our current L2 charger. I don't plan on upgrading to the Ford Connected Charger as going from our current 21 mph charging to 30 mph charging alone isn't worth it it me either. The Ford Connected Charger would have to have lots of really cool bells and whistles to convince me and I don't see that as likely.

What about decisions for a new BEV driver? If I had to install an outlet anyway, I'd install the Ford Connected Charger if my panel would support it. The convenience is worth it to me and the rebates make it cheap. If I already had a 40A outlet I could use I'd try the included 32A mobile charger and see how it worked out. It's really all about what works best for you. There isn't a single answer for everyone.
 

·
Registered
Reserved First Edition Rapid Red Metallic
Joined
·
677 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Presently on Long Island our electric company is giving $500 rebates.

However neither the Ford charger that comes with the MachE nor the Ford connected charger is listed.

Hopefully that changes.

If not then the Juice Box 40 amp, which requires only a 50 amp fuse is on sale at Costco for $549. That makes more sense to me than the Ford Connect for $250 more for marginal improvement in charging time - 40 amps vs. 48 amps. The Juice Box is included in the rebate program. Again presently neither the Ford Charger or the Ford connect is included.

So basically the Juice box will cost me $49 and I will have the Ford charger: I can either keep it in my car or put it on Ebay!

That is why I was trying to get a sense of what people who intend to keep it in their car were going to use it for.

The general consensus is for Level 1 charging.

I think the wire on the Level 1 charges is more pliable and easier to use which makes more sense for emergency use out of the car then the Ford charger which is level 2. Level 1 chargers can be bought on Amazon for under $200

I think the Ford charger on Ebay will bring much more than $200. If not, then I can leave it in my car for emergencies.

So bottom line: I can have a Juice Box 40 amp and the Ford Charger, combination L1 and L2 in my car for $49!

That seems like the best solution.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
96 Posts
Our Mustang MachE will come with, at no extra cost, a 32 amp 240/120 volt charger.

Some have said they plan to install a Ford Home Charger, 48 amp hard wired so as to keep the 32 amp in the trunk when they travel.

As I have read the 120 volt charger, 3 miles per hour is basically useless: Overnight charging will be 30 miles.

So the only reason to carry the 32 amp charger is to plug it into a 240 volt outlet with a 40 amp circuit.

Unless you are visiting someone who has a BEV, it is unlikely they will have a 240 volt 40 amp service. If they have a BEV, you can use their charger - you will not need yours.

Isn't it just easier to use a charging/super charging station?

We do not carry extra gas in our car: when we start to run low we pull into a gas station and fill up.

Why would we do differently with a BEV? when we run low, just pull into a charging station?

In other words in real world driving, when do you plan to use the charging that you are carrying in your trunk?

BTW, there are numerous videos on YouTube about long trips being made in Tesla: not one ever mentioned using anything but a charging station. Never a charger they are carrying in their trunk.

I do not see why that would be any different with the MachE.

For those of you who plan to buy a hard wired charging station, to keep the Ford supplied 32 amp in your car, when and how do you anticipate using it? What am I missing?

Just my $.02

Comments welcome!
I have three L2 chargers now, two at work and one at home. Easy to install, very handy, cheap over the life of the unit. I don't really need two at work, but as the years go by, there will be more BEVs to charge, both mine and customers', and I see them as good investments. Plus, I've always got a handy spare in case one of them fails.

I find that installing them with a plug-in receptacle in a protective box, even outdoors, is better than "hard wiring" them, as you can easily unplug them to reset them (occasionally necessary with my JuiceBox). Plus, if you want to use a different charger, you can do that easily, as long as they have the same 240v receptacle. (So if I had a new spiffy Ford L2 charger, I could probably plug it in and have it working instantly, since I only need the outlet, assuming it is a NEMA 14-50, which is what I'm using.)

I don't carry one in the car, but if you were visiting somewhere with an adjacent outlet, it could be handier than a DCFC, just because of geography and because you could charge to 100%, not the typical 80% of a L3. And you would save a few dollars, but no big deal. Of course, 80% is often enough, so even that is a small advantage...

But I agree that carrying one would be a fairly specific use case, other than the campground scenario already mentioned. And this issue will "go away" fairly quickly, as more and more locations install L2 chargers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
The 120-volt granny charger could give those drivers that need it, 24ish miles while they are at work. When I first got a BEV I was plugging in the back of the building, under a door, and into the woodshop. It covered my commute, both directions.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,148 Posts
i’m new to this game, so i would probably play it safe and get the Ford Wall Charger.

On another note: I visited my workplace this week (been working from home), and was surprised to see charging stations being installed in the employee garage. Installation wasn’t complete yet, but the green LEDs lead me to believe they are Electrify America stations. Too bad my employer won’t pick up the tab.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
96 Posts
The 120-volt granny charger could give those drivers that need it, 24ish miles while they are at work. When I first got a BEV I was plugging in the back of the building, under a door, and into the woodshop. It covered my commute, both directions.
Interesting. When I bought an EV, I installed L2 chargers immediately. I figured it was the only way.

But months later, at an EV event, I was talking with a friendly Tesla Model 3 driver who loved his car and who had maybe 25k miles on it. I asked about his home charger, and he shocked me by saying that all he did was plug into a 110 volt extension cord strung across his driveway (L1).

He said he'd get maybe 35 miles from when he came home from work until he left the next morning, and that was more than his commute, and it would eventually top off his battery. If it didn't, he'd just occasionally go to a nearby Supercharger if he had a long trip.

That method seemed perfectly fine with him. He could presumably afford an L2 charger, and probably had a convenient place to install it. He simply hadn't bothered to do so.

I was amazed.
 

·
Premium Member
2018 Fusion Energi Burgundy Velvet Platinum
Joined
·
753 Posts
Interesting. When I bought an EV, I installed L2 chargers immediately. I figured it was the only way.

But months later, at an EV event, I was talking with a friendly Tesla Model 3 driver who loved his car and who had maybe 25k miles on it. I asked about his home charger, and he shocked me by saying that all he did was plug into a 110 volt extension cord strung across his driveway (L1).

He said he'd get maybe 35 miles from when he came home from work until he left the next morning, and that was more than his commute, and it would eventually top off his battery. If it didn't, he'd just occasionally go to a nearby Supercharger if he had a long trip.

That method seemed perfectly fine with him. He could presumably afford an L2 charger, and probably had a convenient place to install it. He simply hadn't bothered to do so.

I was amazed.
My son in Law used 120v at his home in Oregon and Tesla superchargers before a non local trip. He worked from his home and found that on a daily basis the home plug was sufficient. I had a 50A circuit with a plug in box installed in my garage for $600 and for me that will more than suffice when I move from the PHEV (120v) to the 240v MMe
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
96 Posts
My son in Law used 120v at his home in Oregon and Tesla superchargers before a non local trip. He worked from his home and found that on a daily basis the home plug was sufficient. I had a 50A circuit with a plug in box installed in my garage for $600 and for me that will more than suffice when I move from the PHEV (120v) to the 240v MMe
I can't imagine using 110 volts (L1), but it is interesting that it works for some people. But I'm not the most patient person on the planet... ;)
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top