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Sadly, the same here.

In my immediate neighborhood, there are only two EV owners. On the other side of town, there are maybe a dozen more.
Hopefully, that changes in the next 12 months. I can’t use my detached garage, its too expensive to get the circuit underneath my back yard. So my charger will be on the side of the house by the driveway. I’m sure to get a unit that can be remotely disabled when i’m not using it.
But thats my paranoia and not logic speaking. Someone will steal $3 in electricity, so go spend hundreds more on a secure charger.
Too bad about the burial problem. Been there...
Lol about stealing electricity. If they're that desperate, I would give it to them. :)
But where I am it is very unlikely, so that is easy for me to say.
 

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Too bad about the burial problem. Been there...
Lol about stealing electricity. If they're that desperate, I would give it to them. :)
But where I am it is very unlikely, so that is easy for me to say.
We have out charger listed on PlugShare -- it's carport mounted. If someone is that desperate, come and get it!
 

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A new option if you have 240 but need to split it:

How to get more Level 2 EV charging flexibility without costly electrical work
Bengt Halvorson
BENGT HALVORSON SEPTEMBER 1, 2020

A dedicated 240-volt home-charging circuit is one of the make-or-break essentials for electric vehicle ownership. If you have it, life is easy: plug in each evening, and the battery is charged to your specification by morning. If you don’t—even if you otherwise have the garage space—a 120-volt AC outlet probably won’t cut it.

But American garages—even newer ones, in many cases—are woefully equipped for this. Renters are often left without options, and even owners, installing the circuit and sockets needed for fuss-free charging is often cost-prohibitive as it can require panel upgrades.

NeoCharge Appliance Smart Splitter
NeoCharge Appliance Smart Splitter

That’s where the NeoCharge Smart Splitter launched Tuesday comes in. Simply put, it lets AC vehicle chargers share an existing circuit—like the one you might currently use for your 240V clothes dryer or water heater, in or near a typical home garage.

The project started in 2017 when two Cal Poly engineering students, Spencer Harrison and Akhil Velunu, encountered some of those barriers and looked for a solution. The product they’ve created and refined, measures 5.25 by 5.25 by 2.75 inches and is designed to plug into a 50A circuit.

On the device, there’s a primary and secondary side. So if you have the dryer plugged in as the primary, the device will split what you don’t use by the primary toward the secondary side. Likewise, if you have two car chargers plugged in, the device will split the output depending on the draw of the devices in the same way—in both cases governed by firmware.

The system will work well with either smart-charging or non-networked units you choose to install on the wall, or with the 240V mobile charge cords that many EV makers include with their vehicles.

The U.S.-built device is UL-listed and has been tested for the past two years in various environments—although it’s for indoor use only. Simple LED indicators show power and charging status, and the unit has a quick release to detach from its wall mounting bracket.

NeoCharge supported sockets
NeoCharge supported sockets

It also has built-in wi-fi connectivity for over-the-air firmware upgrades and potential future features, and a mobile app still under development will help track power usage and provide notifications. No app is necessary to use the device on a daily basis.

Two units are available. An Appliance Smart Splitter is rated at 24A total draw, while a Dual-Car Smart Splitter is rated at 40A. They cost $449 and $499, respectively.

NeoCharge has worked with various EV charging companies, utilities, and solar providers, and it’s received interest from several automakers. So expect to hear more about that in the near future.

Clipper Creek HCS-D50 in use
Clipper Creek HCS-D50 in use

If you do have a 50A circuit you can dedicate to EV charging and want to get a second electric car but can’t make room for a second circuit in your electrical panel, there’s another solution that would work well to help split the difference daily and not turn it into a constant shuffle of cars and charging cables. Last month Clipper Creek announced the HCS-D50, which will split its 40 amps (9.6 kw) equally between two cars when both are charging, or send up to 40A through one connector if only one is charging.

That HCS-D50 unit, also U.S.-made, costs $1,479. The upgrade to a unit introduced last year, it’s indoor/outdoor and comes with two 25-foot charging cables and connectors.

What we like about both of these solutions is they can expand the potential of a limited electrical setup without investing more on a new circuit or service panel, which would allow more charging for EVs. And as more people with less-than-perfect home setups go electric, that will be increasingly in-demand.
 

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Great Post: Thanks;

My question is, other than the situation where you have to add an additional panel, does it make economic sense?

For example, most dryers use a 30 amp circuit breaker. This means, when the dryer is not in use, you will only get 24 Amps (80% of 30 AMPS) to your Level 2 charger. In fact the unit is rated at 24 AMPS. Of course less or none when the dryer is in use.

The charger that comes with MachE is 32 AMPS>

Has anyone done a cost analysis of this devise vs. upgrading an electrical panel?

The second devise at $1,479: would it not just be cheaper to have two chargers $ 550 each?
 

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Great Post: Thanks;

My question is, other than the situation where you have to add an additional panel, does it make economic sense?

For example, most dryers use a 30 amp circuit breaker. This means, when the dryer is not in use, you will only get 24 Amps (80% of 30 AMPS) to your Level 2 charger. In fact the unit is rated at 24 AMPS. Of course less or none when the dryer is in use.

The charger that comes with MachE is 32 AMPS>

Has anyone done a cost analysis of this devise vs. upgrading an electrical panel?

The second devise at $1,479: would it not just be cheaper to have two chargers $ 550 each?
Panel upgrades can vary greatly. However, panel replaced with a higher capacity panel is generally $1K and up.

As for the Clipper Creek with dual charging, it allows you to easily manage the charge of two cars off one circuit. It's a convenience benefit. The alternative are two WiFi-controlled units that can talk to each other to do the same thing -- not cheap.
 

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Attached garages are not so difficult to do, as long as the service panel can handle the amperage.

If your garage is detached, like mine, adding the 60 amp circuit could get expensive.
i need to upgrade the underground wiring to my garage to handle the load. They have to trench through my back yard and under pavers. It is way too expensive an endeavor.

I’m just going to attach the charger to the side of my house off the driveway.
Of course, in a cold climate, installing the charger inside a heated garage would be the ideal situation.
 

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Of course, in a cold climate, installing the charger inside a heated garage would be the ideal situation.
So true.
Unfortunately my garage is detached and is not heated. The insulation helps some.
I guess i will install the charge-point on the side of my house for now to see how the first winter goes.
 

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I decided to run a 6AWG wire from my breaker box with a 50A breaker to a NEMA 14-50 outlet. I chose this route to ease the swapping out of charging stations. I also like the idea of having the plug incase the charging station fails and I need to plug the OEM charging cord into a 220 outlet.
EXACTLY what I am doing. Bought the Grizzl E EVSE, and if that ever fails I have the included portable charger to plug in so I am not SOL.
 
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