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If anyone isn't sure what to look for in a home charger for your Mach-E, Consumer Reports has a great article on what to look for and which chargers they recommend to get.

They reviewed a bunch of chargers and recommend 3 of them to look at: JuiceBox 40, ChargePoint HomeFlex, and Blink HQ 100


How to Choose the Right Charger
When shopping for an EVSE, consider the following:
  • Cable length: The length of the charge cable has an impact on where you can mount the EVSE and how easy it is to reach the charge port on the car. Remember that your next EV may have a charging port on a different location on the car, and you’ll want to be able to reach it.
  • Cable management: It’s handy to have a hook to wrap the unused portion of the cable around. Otherwise, if the cable is scattered, it adds clutter in the garage, collects dust, and might cause someone to trip over it. The ability to place the holster for the connector away from the unit might add flexibility in a tight single-car garage.
  • Size: A wide wall charger or a thick one that sticks out far from the wall may encroach on space or your flexibility in placing it in the garage. For instance, a narrow unit might fit between two garage doors and pose a minimum space intrusion.
  • Ease of plugging/unplugging: We like to see a high quality, substantial coupler that lets you smoothly and effortlessly plug and unplug in and out of the car’s port. A solid and secure holster is an advantage, and it gives you confidence that the coupler will stay secure.
  • Smart or dumb charging: Some EVSEs have a smartphone app that communicates with the unit over WiFi or through Bluetooth. With an app, you can monitor the charging and view various stats. This sounds like a nice feature to have, but it isn’t essential because most EVs have their own app that communicates with the car.
  • Ability to delay charging: You may benefit from cheaper off-peak electricity costs, depending on your utility company. In such cases, being able to easily delay charging can save real money. Some cars, like those from Tesla, allow you to control the charging time from within the car or via an app.
  • Resuming charging automatically after a power outage: If you live in an area that has frequent power outages, it’s nice to know that charging will resume once the power is back on. That's better than being surprised when your EV isn't sufficiently charged when you’re ready to drive.
  • Weatherproof: For those without a garage, look for an EVSE that can stand up to inclement weather. (Manufacturers of most of EVSEs claim that they're weatherproof.)
  • UL Listed: It’s wise to pick an EVSE that’s Underwriters Laboratories (UL) or ETL (Edison Testing Laboratories) listed, which indicates it complies with safety standards established by nationally recognized testing labs. Every charger featured here has such a safety rating, indicated with a seal.
  • Hardwired or a plug-in type: The early EVSEs were mostly hardwired, meaning they were permanently installed. Current offerings are mostly plug-in units. We prefer those because of their portability and easier installation. You may still need to have a professional electrician run a 240-volt line and install an appropriate outlet in your garage or outdoor location.
 

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If anyone isn't sure what to look for in a home charger for your Mach-E, Consumer Reports has a great article on what to look for and which chargers they recommend to get.

They reviewed a bunch of chargers and recommend 3 of them to look at: JuiceBox 40, ChargePoint HomeFlex, and Blink HQ 100


How to Choose the Right Charger
When shopping for an EVSE, consider the following:
  • Cable length: The length of the charge cable has an impact on where you can mount the EVSE and how easy it is to reach the charge port on the car. Remember that your next EV may have a charging port on a different location on the car, and you’ll want to be able to reach it.
  • Cable management: It’s handy to have a hook to wrap the unused portion of the cable around. Otherwise, if the cable is scattered, it adds clutter in the garage, collects dust, and might cause someone to trip over it. The ability to place the holster for the connector away from the unit might add flexibility in a tight single-car garage.
  • Size: A wide wall charger or a thick one that sticks out far from the wall may encroach on space or your flexibility in placing it in the garage. For instance, a narrow unit might fit between two garage doors and pose a minimum space intrusion.
  • Ease of plugging/unplugging: We like to see a high quality, substantial coupler that lets you smoothly and effortlessly plug and unplug in and out of the car’s port. A solid and secure holster is an advantage, and it gives you confidence that the coupler will stay secure.
  • Smart or dumb charging: Some EVSEs have a smartphone app that communicates with the unit over WiFi or through Bluetooth. With an app, you can monitor the charging and view various stats. This sounds like a nice feature to have, but it isn’t essential because most EVs have their own app that communicates with the car.
  • Ability to delay charging: You may benefit from cheaper off-peak electricity costs, depending on your utility company. In such cases, being able to easily delay charging can save real money. Some cars, like those from Tesla, allow you to control the charging time from within the car or via an app.
  • Resuming charging automatically after a power outage: If you live in an area that has frequent power outages, it’s nice to know that charging will resume once the power is back on. That's better than being surprised when your EV isn't sufficiently charged when you’re ready to drive.
  • Weatherproof: For those without a garage, look for an EVSE that can stand up to inclement weather. (Manufacturers of most of EVSEs claim that they're weatherproof.)
  • UL Listed: It’s wise to pick an EVSE that’s Underwriters Laboratories (UL) or ETL (Edison Testing Laboratories) listed, which indicates it complies with safety standards established by nationally recognized testing labs. Every charger featured here has such a safety rating, indicated with a seal.
  • Hardwired or a plug-in type: The early EVSEs were mostly hardwired, meaning they were permanently installed. Current offerings are mostly plug-in units. We prefer those because of their portability and easier installation. You may still need to have a professional electrician run a 240-volt line and install an appropriate outlet in your garage or outdoor location.
I have a 14-50 240V receptacle on a 50 Amp breaker. I understand that sustained charging on a breaker is 80% of the breaker's rating 50A breaker = 40A sustained charging. If the wall unit has a max capacity of 40 A (Juicebox) does that indicate that it will charge at 40 A on a 50A breaker or max out at 32A which is 80% of the charger's 40 Amp. rating?
 

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I have a 14-50 240V receptacle on a 50 Amp breaker. I understand that sustained charging on a breaker is 80% of the breaker's rating 50A breaker = 40A sustained charging. If the wall unit has a max capacity of 40 A (Juicebox) does that indicate that it will charge at 40 A on a 50A breaker or max out at 32A which is 80% of the charger's 40 Amp. rating?
Part Deux: Is it better for battery life to charge longer times at a lower amperage?
 

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I have a 14-50 240V receptacle on a 50 Amp breaker. I understand that sustained charging on a breaker is 80% of the breaker's rating 50A breaker = 40A sustained charging. If the wall unit has a max capacity of 40 A (Juicebox) does that indicate that it will charge at 40 A on a 50A breaker or max out at 32A which is 80% of the charger's 40 Amp. rating?
From everything I have read the Juice Box 40 on a 50 amp circuit will charge at 40 Amps which is 80% of the rating of the circuit breaker.

It is not 80% of the rating of the charging station.

..
 

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If anyone isn't sure what to look for in a home charger for your Mach-E, Consumer Reports has a great article on what to look for and which chargers they recommend to get.

They reviewed a bunch of chargers and recommend 3 of them to look at: JuiceBox 40, ChargePoint HomeFlex, and Blink HQ 100


How to Choose the Right Charger
When shopping for an EVSE, consider the following:
  • Cable length: The length of the charge cable has an impact on where you can mount the EVSE and how easy it is to reach the charge port on the car. Remember that your next EV may have a charging port on a different location on the car, and you’ll want to be able to reach it.
  • Cable management: It’s handy to have a hook to wrap the unused portion of the cable around. Otherwise, if the cable is scattered, it adds clutter in the garage, collects dust, and might cause someone to trip over it. The ability to place the holster for the connector away from the unit might add flexibility in a tight single-car garage.
  • Size: A wide wall charger or a thick one that sticks out far from the wall may encroach on space or your flexibility in placing it in the garage. For instance, a narrow unit might fit between two garage doors and pose a minimum space intrusion.
  • Ease of plugging/unplugging: We like to see a high quality, substantial coupler that lets you smoothly and effortlessly plug and unplug in and out of the car’s port. A solid and secure holster is an advantage, and it gives you confidence that the coupler will stay secure.
  • Smart or dumb charging: Some EVSEs have a smartphone app that communicates with the unit over WiFi or through Bluetooth. With an app, you can monitor the charging and view various stats. This sounds like a nice feature to have, but it isn’t essential because most EVs have their own app that communicates with the car.
  • Ability to delay charging: You may benefit from cheaper off-peak electricity costs, depending on your utility company. In such cases, being able to easily delay charging can save real money. Some cars, like those from Tesla, allow you to control the charging time from within the car or via an app.
  • Resuming charging automatically after a power outage: If you live in an area that has frequent power outages, it’s nice to know that charging will resume once the power is back on. That's better than being surprised when your EV isn't sufficiently charged when you’re ready to drive.
  • Weatherproof: For those without a garage, look for an EVSE that can stand up to inclement weather. (Manufacturers of most of EVSEs claim that they're weatherproof.)
  • UL Listed: It’s wise to pick an EVSE that’s Underwriters Laboratories (UL) or ETL (Edison Testing Laboratories) listed, which indicates it complies with safety standards established by nationally recognized testing labs. Every charger featured here has such a safety rating, indicated with a seal.
  • Hardwired or a plug-in type: The early EVSEs were mostly hardwired, meaning they were permanently installed. Current offerings are mostly plug-in units. We prefer those because of their portability and easier installation. You may still need to have a professional electrician run a 240-volt line and install an appropriate outlet in your garage or outdoor location.

If you not going with the Ford supplied charging station, (free with MME) 32 Amp, I think it is extremely important that any after market charging station by "UL" approved.

The ones recommended by CR are UP approved.

When you go to Amazon, many of the ones listed are not. I would never buy one and have it installed that is not UL approved.

Just my $.02
 

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Does the tax credit for home charger installation include the cost of installing the breaker and the outlet or just the charging station?
 

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Does the tax credit for home charger installation include the cost of installing the breaker and the outlet or just the charging station?
Depends on your state.

In NY the rebate is $500. You have to provide proof of purchase.

Interesting that neither the Ford charging station nor the Tesla charging station are on the rebate list.

Some of us have postulated that it may be better to buy the a 40 Amp charger, collect the rebate, so your out of pocket is about $150 plus the electrician charge, which you would have to pay regardless of the charger, and then sell the Ford Charger on Ebay or use it as a travel charger.

If you lease you, at lease end you may be required to return the Ford Charger.

One final point: Chargers up to 32 Amps can be plugged in. 40 amps and above must be hardwired.

I understand this is per electrical code.


.
 

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Depends on your state.

In NY the rebate is $500. You have to provide proof of purchase.

Interesting that neither the Ford charging station nor the Tesla charging station are on the rebate list.

Some of us have postulated that it may be better to buy the a 40 Amp charger, collect the rebate, so your out of pocket is about $150 plus the electrician charge, which you would have to pay regardless of the charger, and then sell the Ford Charger on Ebay or use it as a travel charger.

If you lease you, at lease end you may be required to return the Ford Charger.

One final point: Chargers up to 32 Amps can be plugged in. 40 amps and above must be hardwired.

I understand this is per electrical code.


.
I was referring to the 30% Federal which was extended to 31 Dec. 2020. Nevada has no rebate program. The Juice box lists a 14-50 box & plug with #6 wire for up to a 50 amp breaker (40 amp charger) and hardwire over that. Thanks, I'll check
 

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I was referring to the 30% Federal which was extended to 31 Dec. 2020. Nevada has no rebate program. The Juice box lists a 14-50 box & plug with #6 wire for up to a 50 amp breaker (40 amp charger) and hardwire over that. Thanks, I'll check
Thanks for posting about the 30% residential tax credits.


Here is the form:



HOME » THE HUB » AND TAX CREDITS » 4 THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE EV CHARGING TAX CREDIT

4 things you need to know about the EV Charging Tax Credit
Posted on March 11, 2020 | by Neil Baunsgard
In a late December session, congress passed a bill that extended the electric vehicle charging tax credit that will cover 30% of the cost for residential or workplace charging. Because the EV charging tax credit got passed right at the end of 2019, there has been very little information available for you to file your 2019 taxes. Here are the details that may help you get a bigger tax refund, or help you afford EV charging in 2020.
Please consult with your tax professional to see how these credits apply to you. This information does not constitute tax advice and cannot be used to avoid tax penalties.
  • Tax credits are available for EV charger hardware and installation costs.
Install costs can account for the majority of the total cost of installing EV charging especially for commercial installations. This importantly covers both components on charging costs.
  • 30% tax credit up to $1,000 for residential and $30,000 for commercial.
You use form 8911 to apply for the Federal EV charging tax credit. It covers 30% of the costs with a max of $1,000 credit for residents and $30,000 tax credit for commercial installs.
  • You can still apply for installs as early as 2017.
Did you install charging in 2017 or 2018? Not to worry, you are still eligible for the tax credit! It retroactively applies for installs in 2017 and doesn’t expire until the end of 2020. If your install happened before 2019 you will have to file an amended return to claim your charging credit.
  • Other business EV charging incentives are available.
We are seeing EV charging pop up all over Oregon. With the 30% Federal Tax credit and many other incentives and grants available from utilities and municipalities, 2020 is a great year to install. The list of opportunities for funding is always changing and we will do our best to keep you up to date. Right now, there are currently Level 2 chargers available for interested workplaces in Central Oregon as well as grants for installs in Oregon Electric Community Co-op Territories.
Please reach out to Neil at [email protected] or call him at 541-385-6908 x12 for more information.
Posted in and Tax Credits, Electric Vehicles, Energy, TransportationPost navigation

see: 4 things you need to know about the EV Charging Tax Credit | The Environmental Center
 

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In my case because im always on the road and because i csn even get calls during the night the speed difference of a 48amp juicebox vs a 32 is important. Plus there's always a risk of it being stolen/lost if i use the portable all the time.
 

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In my case because im always on the road and because i csn even get calls during the night the speed difference of a 48amp juicebox vs a 32 is important. Plus there's always a risk of it being stolen/lost if i use the portable all the time.

Remember with a 48 Amp juice box you will need a 60 Amp circuit. This may require upgrading your electrical panel.
 

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In my case because im always on the road and because i csn even get calls during the night the speed difference of a 48amp juicebox vs a 32 is important. Plus there's always a risk of it being stolen/lost if i use the portable all the time.
I couldn't pass up the opportunity to get the 30% tax credit off the price of the Juice Box and the cost of the 240v line installation earlier in the year. It expires in December and I don't have high hopes that it will be renewed by our Congress.
 

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I couldn't pass up the opportunity to get the 30% tax credit off the price of the Juice Box and the cost of the 240v line installation earlier in the year. It expires in December and I don't have high hopes that it will be renewed by our Congress.
Today's events in Washington, DC. are most unfortunate.

This may lead to a change in Washington and continued support in 2021 for EV's from a new administration.
 
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