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Discussion Starter #1
Alright, I was a bit anxious about taking this first step, but now that I’ve done even more research, including a cost model, I’m even more excited to get my Mach E.

I have a question for those interested... has anyone settled on a home charger option? If I’m interpreting the Ford FAQs correctly, it will come with a Ford charger that connects to a standard 110 or a 220. I’m leaning towards the Level 2 - 220 option which charges at ~22 MPH.
 

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That's the way I read it too -- comes with the standard charger for 110v/220v, which should be plenty sufficient for most people. I'll need to have a 220v outlet installed in the garage at some point, but I don't think I'll even address that until after final decision to lock in the purchase. Even at just 110v, should be able to "refuel" 45 miles in 15 hours overnight, which would get me by until I got the 220v installed.

I'll have to see what the Amazon options is they refer to for installing a charger outlet. But I'm guessing just hiring a local electrician will probably be the way to go.
 

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At first, I plan to use the one provided with the car, which like @dbsb3233 said, supports both 110 and 220V. It seems pretty capable. I just need to be sure it can be reduced down to run at 16A 240V, or if I do some simple upgrades to my existing receptacles and breaker, then 24A @ 240V. My current 240V circuits in the garage are 20A, but I have one of the 120V circuits using 10-3 NM-B wiring so I could re-purpose/redo that circuit to be two pole (240V) 30A.

I want to mount the charger unit to the ceiling of my garage, and use some simple ceiling hooks to route the cord so that the "nozzle" hangs down adjacent to where I need to plug it in to the car. When not charging the car, I'll rest the nozzle on a nearby shelf, or in a wall mounted plastic holster.

If this type of ceiling mounting doesn't seem possible with Ford's bundled charger, then I'll almost certainly be buying a second EVSE that can be mounted this way.

Also, if Ford's pricing is competitive, and assuming I can ceiling mount, I'm thinking of maybe using the $210 FordPass Rewards included with the new car purchase towards the cost of the Ford's "connected wall charger" or maybe just a second copy of the included "mobile" charger. That way I can keep the included EVSE in the car, or maybe set it up at my parents' house.

If Ford's pricing is egregious, and assuming I decide to splurge on a second EVSE, these are the ones I'm currently considering:
The Grizzl-E and JuiceBox options include NEMA 14-50 plugs which make me nervous, since I want to put it on a 30 amp circuit. So I'd probably hard-wire them to avoid having it look wrong. I confirmed that there are dip switches in the Grizzl-E to set it's maximum current flow to 24A (for the 30A) circuit. I'd need to confirm the same for the JuiceBox. Or I'd have to replace wiring with something rated for 50A (e.g. 6-3 copper) but I'm trying to avoid that.
 

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I want to mount the charger unit to the ceiling of my garage, and use some simple ceiling hooks to route the cord so that the "nozzle" hangs down adjacent to where I need to plug it in to the car. When not charging the car, I'll rest the nozzle on a nearby shelf, or in a wall mounted plastic holster.
It's funny you mention that because I had the same thought. I was thinking I could rig a Tool Balancer
 

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Yeah I was thinking about the balancers, too, after seeing some forum posts where folks used retractable clothes drying lines. But long term I'm thinking the balancer cable may fray or snap, unless you buy an expensive one... so I was thinking of just using some basic hooks like this or that.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
That's the way I read it too -- comes with the standard charger for 110v/220v, which should be plenty sufficient for most people. I'll need to have a 220v outlet installed in the garage at some point, but I don't think I'll even address that until after final decision to lock in the purchase. Even at just 110v, should be able to "refuel" 45 miles in 15 hours overnight, which would get me by until I got the 220v installed.

I'll have to see what the Amazon options is they refer to for installing a charger outlet. But I'm guessing just hiring a local electrician will probably be the way to go.
I believe the Amazon charger is for the Level 3 DC option which would be unnecessary for me. Maybe I missed something...
 

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Discussion Starter #7
At first, I plan to use the one provided with the car, which like @dbsb3233 said, supports both 110 and 220V. It seems pretty capable. I just need to be sure it can be reduced down to run at 16A 240V, or if I do some simple upgrades to my existing receptacles and breaker, then 24A @ 240V. My current 240V circuits in the garage are 20A, but I have one of the 120V circuits using 10-3 NM-B wiring so I could re-purpose/redo that circuit to be two pole (240V) 30A.

I want to mount the charger unit to the ceiling of my garage, and use some simple ceiling hooks to route the cord so that the "nozzle" hangs down adjacent to where I need to plug it in to the car. When not charging the car, I'll rest the nozzle on a nearby shelf, or in a wall mounted plastic holster.

If this type of ceiling mounting doesn't seem possible with Ford's bundled charger, then I'll almost certainly be buying a second EVSE that can be mounted this way.

Also, if Ford's pricing is competitive, and assuming I can ceiling mount, I'm thinking of maybe using the $210 FordPass Rewards included with the new car purchase towards the cost of the Ford's "connected wall charger" or maybe just a second copy of the included "mobile" charger. That way I can keep the included EVSE in the car, or maybe set it up at my parents' house.

If Ford's pricing is egregious, and assuming I decide to splurge on a second EVSE, these are the ones I'm currently considering:
The Grizzl-E and JuiceBox options include NEMA 14-50 plugs which make me nervous, since I want to put it on a 30 amp circuit. So I'd probably hard-wire them to avoid having it look wrong. I confirmed that there are dip switches in the Grizzl-E to set it's maximum current flow to 24A (for the 30A) circuit. I'd need to confirm the same for the JuiceBox. Or I'd have to replace wiring with something rated for 50A (e.g. 6-3 copper) but I'm trying to avoid that.
I consider myself an amateur electrician. You should be able to swap out those breakers for a higher amperage if your box can handle it.
 

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No, it's still AC Level 2. This is from Ford's Mustang Mach-E FAQ:

How can I charge my Mustang Mach-E at home?

Most charging is done at home. Your vehicle is equipped with a Ford Mobile Charger that is estimated to add an average range of 22 miles per charging hour through a 240V outlet. The same Ford Mobile Charger is estimated to add an average range of three miles per charging hour on a 120V outlet and you can plug in just about anywhere. For a faster home charge rate, Ford recommends the available Ford Connected Charge Station that is wifi-enabled adding an estimated average range of 32 miles per charging hour through a 240V outlet for a full charge overnight. You will be able to finance the Connected Charge Station at time of vehicle purchase. In the US, Ford offers a program with Amazon that makes home installation of a 240V outlet easy and convenient.
I interpret this to mean that even though the vehicle includes Ford Mobile Charger, you may elect to buy an additional charger (Ford Connected Charge Station) that's slightly more capable (48A vs. 32A, and Wi-Fi vs no Wi-Fi). And if you purchase the extra EVSE at the time of vehicle sale, it can be included in vehicle financing (if you prefer).

In either case, you can elect to arrange for an electrician to install a 240V outlet if you need or want it. And if you prefer to do that through the dealership/Ford instead of finding one independently, then Ford has arranged to go through Amazon, which in turn just brokers the job to an electrician in your area. And possibly by doing it that way, the cost of the electrician and her materials could be rolled into the vehicle's financing. (But I'm not sure about that last part with the financing.)

 

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Sorry, I should have worded that last part differently. Ford just passes you through to Amazon for any household electrical work that you want to buy from them -- including installation of the Ford's mobile or connected chargers, and also installation of the 240V circuit (if needed).
 

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Discussion Starter #10
No, it's still AC Level 2. This is from Ford's Mustang Mach-E FAQ:



I interpret this to mean that even though the vehicle includes Ford Mobile Charger, you may elect to buy an additional charger (Ford Connected Charge Station) that's slightly more capable (48A vs. 32A, and Wi-Fi vs no Wi-Fi). And if you purchase the extra EVSE at the time of vehicle sale, it can be included in vehicle financing (if you prefer).

In either case, you can elect to arrange for an electrician to install a 240V outlet if you need or want it. And if you prefer to do that through the dealership/Ford instead of finding one independently, then Ford has arranged to go through Amazon, which in turn just brokers the job to an electrician in your area. And possibly by doing it that way, the cost of the electrician and her materials could be rolled into the vehicle's financing. (But I'm not sure about that last part with the financing.)

I’m still not clear on what’s different with the Level 3 DC charger. For example, if I run a 220 40 AMP to my garage, I think I can use the standard Ford charger, and also upgrade to the Level 3 DC charger with the same 220 outlet, but I am not 100%.
 

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I consider myself an amateur electrician. You should be able to swap out those breakers for a higher amperage if your box can handle it.
Yeah I'm not an electrician either... But I ran 70A to my garage from the main load center (85 feet away) back in 2004 or so, to use for wood working tools. At that time, I put in a secondary load center in the garage where it breaks out to a bunch of 20A circuits. Some are 120V and some are 240V. Due to the circuit length, one of those 120V circuits is using 10-3 wire. So my plan is to significantly reduce the length of that circuit, replacing its one or two remaining outlets with NEMA 14-30R receptacles, and replacing the 1-pole breaker with a 2-pole 30A. All that is doable without making new holes in the walls/ceiling or pulling any new wires.
 

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I’m still not clear on what’s different with the Level 3 DC charger. For example, if I run a 220 40 AMP to my garage, I think I can use the standard Ford charger, and also upgrade to the Level 3 DC charger with the same 220 outlet, but I am not 100%.
It's not a level 3 DC charger... Ford is offering two different Level 2 AC chargers. The conversion from AC to DC happens inside the vehicle.

The "free" (bundled) mobile charger has a max charging current of 32A, which can deliver an estimated 22 miles of range per hour if you have it on a 40A or greater circuit.

The optional wall charger has a max charging current of 48A, which can deliver an estimated 32 miles of range per hour to the Mach-E. But it requires a circuit rated for 60A or more, and must be hard wired instead of plugged in.

Both of those chargers are capable of using more current than my garage wiring can safely handle. So in either case, I have to make sure to limit their charge rates to what is safe. There will be an interface on the car's touch screen to set that up. But I would feel more comfortable knowing that there's also a way to physically set that limit on the EVSE, such as through dip switches that are set during installation. I don't think we'll know that for sure until the installation instructions become available. But this is one of the reasons I'm keeping the ClipperCreek 24A EVSE on my wish list.
 

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I've already got outlets on the ceiling, plus the cable coming out of the EVSE going into the car is like 18-25 feet long, so no extension cables for me. Also be careful if you use extensions to run the new circuit length through a wire gauge calculator to see if it is safe.
 
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