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A three hour trip is about 200 miles. Even if you stopped once for a charge along the way, that's about 30 minutes. How is it figuring a 2 hour adder? Charge at your parents home town and then maybe one more 30 minute stop on the way home.
I entered in going the speed limit (75mph-80mph) and I figured in a 20mph wind.
 

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A three hour trip is about 200 miles. Even if you stopped once for a charge along the way, that's about 30 minutes. How is it figuring a 2 hour adder? Charge at your parents home town and then maybe one more 30 minute stop on the way home.
depends if it is a dc fast charger or level 2 ac
 

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Yeh, after rereading this. That's a typo. It added an hour. 15 min stop 80miles from here. 45 min stop 20 miles from destination. That was to be able to get back to the stop on the way home. No giving lot rides when I get there. LOL!
depends if it is a dc fast charger or level 2 ac
 

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Isn’t the ER battery faster and more powerful?
If comparing RWD SR to RWD ER, you get about 27 more HP and it shaves a second off the 0-60 time. It gives you an additional 70 miles range ( all specs estimates, nothing official yet).

Think about your driving habits, would these numbers matter much to justify the extra money?

For me, its a yes because I frequent long trips during the year.

How about you?
 

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Isn’t the ER battery faster and more powerful?
More cells can deliver more power. The ER has 376 cells, the SR has 288.

In reverse power in : The ER charges with max 150 kwh/376 = 400 wh per cell. The SR charges with 115 kwh/288= 400 wh per cell.

according to the fact sheet the ER delivers 285 hp and the SR 255 Hp.
When the SR is the max the engine can deliver then the max for the ER = 255 * 376/288 = 332 hp. This seems to match the max power of the First Edition.

but we don’t know if the engines are the same.
 

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we don’t know if the engines are the same.
Remember: no engines, only electric motors.
ER has more cells and more robust “wiring”. We know ER will Charger faster. It will probably discharge faster too (more torque, faster 0-60).
AWD has 2nd (front) motor, so even faster. Front motor on GT larger, so even faster.
 

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Remember: no engines, only electric motors.
ER has more cells and more robust “wiring”. We know ER will Charger faster. It will probably discharge faster too (more torque, faster 0-60).
AWD has 2nd (front) motor, so even faster. Front motor on GT larger, so even faster.
Actually the standard range rear wheel drive is slightly faster than the extended range. I guess the added weight slows it down a little bit.

961

962
 

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Can't wait to see what the MME's real-world range numbers are like
 

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Can't wait to see what the MME's real-world range numbers are like
The author gets this wrong -- it's much better than 8 miles over. While the driver went 308 miles, it was in a Mach E4X. That isn't 8 miles over the EPA target range, that's 38 miles over. The EPA target for the E4X is 270 miles.
 

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The author gets this wrong -- it's much better than 8 miles over. While the driver went 308 miles, it was in a Mach E4X. That isn't 8 miles over the EPA target range, that's 38 miles over. The EPA target for the E4X is 270 miles.
According to the video data: The trip used 86% of the battery to get 484km. At that rate, it would be 563km for 100%. Or about 350 miles for a full charge.

That’s 80 miles over the 270 mile EPA target.

Things we don’t know about this test: speed, elevation changes, temperature, AC on/off, etc. The weather does look clear, though.

All in all, it looks promising.
 

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I'm completely committed to making long trips at a more relaxed pace to allow for charging stops. The pace of charging infrastructure builds in our province is reassuring and gives me confidence I can find a charger. Some early adopters have been making cross-Canada trips to show this is feasible. Finding a hotel with a charger is quite possible now & you can add Ford dealers to the list of locations. I book bands and a number of band members are travelling by EV to get to our city for shows. They manage to arrive on time. Yes, more range is a feature I want to make travelling easier and I won't be considering the short-range option.
 

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Discussion Starter #95
I'm completely committed to making long trips at a more relaxed pace to allow for charging stops.
That just became more palatable in the US as Electrify America dramatically lowered their rates. They're now roughly the same as the price of gas, instead of being ~2x the cost of gas like they were.

It was looking like a double-whammy to lose both time AND money to drive the BEV on road trips instead of the ICE. Now it's more just the loss of time (and a bit of anxiety since charger coverage and dependability is still rather weak).

While the extra money wasn't huge, it was a psychological barrier that just made it harder to justify taking the Mach-E over the Escape on our 785 mile Denver-Vegas drives a few times/year.
 

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Great question ... my sister bought a Tesla 3 and NOT with the extended range battery. She told me it was her only regret she went cheap on the battery. She told me regardless of what I buy, a Tesla, MME, etc to get the max battery that I could. She told me because EVERYTHING in the car is ran on the battery including A/C, heater, any motor fan, etc. Living in Arizona where summer temps can reach 100 plus everyday in the summer I want .... no I NEED the A/C. With the extended battery I know I'll have the A/C & not have to worry about running out of power before I get to my destination. She currently lives in Mobile & drives to Disney World several times a year on a single charge. Now with Hurricane Sally & hundreds of thousands without power she wishes she had that extended power battery. Of coarse they have a ICE truck to manage but it's not the first & won't be the last time this will happen.
 

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I would only think the ER would pencil out for people who drive over 200 miles in a day at least twice a week.

Having said that, at only $5k for 25 more kWh, it’s hard to pass up if you’ve got the extra $5k. If you have any doubt, spend the extra and get it. You will also cycle your battery less often.

I’ve put over 40k miles on a 35.8 kWk (32 useable) eGolf and can comfortably say the SR MME is plenty of range for a vast majority of drivers, myself included. I also think we will see it come in at 240-250 EPA range.
 

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Using your own example, after putting 40k miles on a BEV whose range is up to 125 miles, you've determined that the MME with 230 mile range will be more than sufficient for your needs.

So if I'm in a similar situation (I drive ~40 miles per day), why would I want to pay $5k for additional range that I'll rarely ever use, with a 30% worse environmental and unsafe labor impact, and 400 extra pounds to be towed along everywhere for additional tire wear and drag?

I can afford the extra $5k though I'd prefer to use that money for other purposes. Also, some folks will weigh or even debate the environmental and child labor impacts in different ways than others. That's okay. Even if we temporarily ignore other impacts and simplify this down to range per full tank and cost for that range, how would you recommend we decide when to stop upgrading range?

For example with the Mach-E, Ford is offering only two battery pack options. Say they offered 10 options ranging from 125 miles up to 900 miles per full battery. Would you choose the biggest pack you can afford? Why?
 

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Using your own example, after putting 40k miles on a BEV whose range is up to 125 miles, you've determined that the MME with 230 mile range will be more than sufficient for your needs.

So if I'm in a similar situation (I drive ~40 miles per day), why would I want to pay $5k for additional range that I'll rarely ever use, with a 30% worse environmental and unsafe labor impact, and 400 extra pounds to be towed along everywhere for additional tire wear and drag?

I can afford the extra $5k though I'd prefer to use that money for other purposes. Also, some folks will weigh or even debate the environmental and child labor impacts in different ways than others. That's okay. Even if we temporarily ignore other impacts and simplify this down to range per full tank and cost for that range, how would you recommend we decide when to stop upgrading range?

For example with the Mach-E, Ford is offering only two battery pack options. Say they offered 10 options ranging from 125 miles up to 900 miles per full battery. Would you choose the biggest pack you can afford? Why?
I would choose about 350 miles, because I live about 200 miles from the nearest major airport, and in the winter, with a fierce headwind, I could still arrive with a decent range left.

Also, I'm not sure how the EV market will go in the next few years, but I think there is a decent chance that cars with range less than 300-350 miles will be worth less on the used market, because advances in both efficiency and battery tech will make cars with less range seem, well, inadequate.

On the second point, I am not sure, because a better charging infrastructure could change the calculus, and I also think that will occur fairly quickly. In that scenario, I think that DCFC charging rates will be a bigger deal than range.

ymmv.
 
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