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EVs are hear to stay. And they will no doubt improve.
I have a GT in order but also have plenty of questions and concerns.

Small concerns:
- How will the car perform in the sun freezing cold weather?

- Insurance costs?

Big concerns:
  • Repair costs and warranties. Tesla’s are expensive as hell to repair. While the 8 year warranty has been great, many Tesla’s have had multiple motors replaced and battery packs. Outside if warranty, they cost a bundle. How well will Ford stand behind these? And will they do better than Tesla?
  • Resale. That’s a big unknown right now.
I am inclined to lease my GT. Why? It ensures a way out of this product is not ready for prime time. Most people lease Tesla’s or at least did early on for these same reasons. It’s a great way to leverage the tax credit too. While I am not inclined to lease a car and if I did, woukd nktmally not consider putting money down. On a car with a tax credit, I would.
Taking the 7500 tax credit plus another 2500 would lower a lease payment by $275 a month. Naturally though, it depends on how Ford crafts these deals. But doing the math on other similarly priced cars and Tesla’s, I would think a $500 a month lease payment with $10,000 down is what we can expect.
 

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Insurance is an unknown right now, but I really don't see why it would be any different from another car in that price range. A lot will depend on your record, age, sex and where you live.
 

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Yeah insurance providers still haven't gotten a full grasp on EV. What's cool when it comes to EVs is the per-mile insurance that's available for Tesla drivers in the UK.

 

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EVs are hear to stay. And they will no doubt improve.
I have a GT in order but also have plenty of questions and concerns.

Small concerns:
- How will the car perform in the sun freezing cold weather?

- Insurance costs?

Big concerns:
  • Repair costs and warranties. Tesla’s are expensive as hell to repair. While the 8 year warranty has been great, many Tesla’s have had multiple motors replaced and battery packs. Outside if warranty, they cost a bundle. How well will Ford stand behind these? And will they do better than Tesla?
  • Resale. That’s a big unknown right now.
I am inclined to lease my GT. Why? It ensures a way out of this product is not ready for prime time. Most people lease Tesla’s or at least did early on for these same reasons. It’s a great way to leverage the tax credit too. While I am not inclined to lease a car and if I did, woukd nktmally not consider putting money down. On a car with a tax credit, I would.
Taking the 7500 tax credit plus another 2500 would lower a lease payment by $275 a month. Naturally though, it depends on how Ford crafts these deals. But doing the math on other similarly priced cars and Tesla’s, I would think a $500 a month lease payment with $10,000 down is what we can expect.
Cold weather. I have an air cooled battery at the moment but my range definitely suffers by as much as 20 to even 30 percent sometimes. But just like an ICE it depends on your habits. My soul actually has a heat pump which is way more efficient than typical resistive heaters but comes with an added cost. 8 year 100000 mile warranty is industry standard so should cover you while financing is going on. But I would expect them to give in any after that. I'm sure they'll want to sell you another and at a cheaper cost because it should get cheaper over time. That being said that hurts the used market and your resale. Resales will be more like a luxury car than a typical Honda or Toyota. I would say you're safer with a lease and it makes it alot easier with the tax credit.
 

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Insurance is an unknown right now, but I really don't see why it would be any different from another car in that price range. A lot will depend on your record, age, sex and where you live.
I am an insurance agent in California. The Mach e is an unknown and as such there is no data. However there are other factors that come into play in terms of insurance costs. it is not just the cost of the car, but the availability of parts, labor and replacement costs as well as geography and demographics to a point. Lets talk Tesla 3. I live in Bakersfield 2 hours north of LA and basically it is cheaper then LA. Facts about Tesla. Tesla will NOT sell parts to ANY body shop unless it is a Tesla shop. Tesla is an all aluminum frame to the best of my knowledge. A Tesla 3 RWD costing about $40K runs about $600 for 6 months. A Tesla 3 AWD about $60,000 costs about $900. I believe that the Mustang E other then the GT will be a very reasonable price as it is a Ford and can be fixed anywhere and parts are easily available.
 

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Cold weather issues based upon Tesla owners-loss of range 30-35% in real winter cold-not 40f. Cold weather such as this will also impact charging rates as a cold HVB will charge far slower than one at a more warmer temperature. Use of the car heater will also impact range significantly in cold winter weather so heated seats are a must. I drive a Cmax Energi and note the loss of range in colder weather.

Charging cost for fast charging stations via Electrify America is going to be more expensive than driving a fuel combustion vehicle at current fuel prices. Sad but true.

Unknown- number of fast charger stations is going to be an issue if you live in a rural area. In the UP of Michigan there is zero Tesla or any other fast charging stations. Most of Wisconsin (Milwaukee-Madison north) do not have any fast charging stations that work with what Ford is offering. Don't expect Electrify America to start building networks in rural areas, their planning maps do not indicate this. It is going to take a number of years before those in the far rural areas have adequate access. A reason to purchase as large of battery as possible.
 

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Speaking from experience with my Leaf, I lose 30-40% of my piddly range sub-freezing. It all depends on much I run the heat. Below 32, the heat pump it has is largely not useful so it runs resistive heat. Even if I do not run the heat though, the battery is just less efficient in the cold.
 

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Also note that most EV drivers don't regularly use the top and bottom 10% or 20% of the battery pack....then you tack on the range decrease from the cold. Even in the mid-30 degree temp range, when going highway speeds, range can drop somewhere in the high-40% range.
 

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Also note that most EV drivers don't regularly use the top and bottom 10% or 20% of the battery pack....then you tack on the range decrease from the cold. Even in the mid-30 degree temp range, when going highway speeds, range can drop somewhere in the high-40% range.
That's true, it would be hard to constantly start all your trips at 100% charge.
 

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The Fast Lane Car did an interesting test with the Kia Niro going up to Loveland Pass in Colorado. Much of that run was below freezing.
This didn't look too bad to me......
 

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That's true, it would be hard to constantly start all your trips at 100% charge.
It really is a Catch-22. 15 hours of overnight 220v charging at home makes it easy to give it a full charge. But we don't really need 100% then because we're not driving anywhere close to max range around town. (I assume we can just set the car to charge to 80% then since it's better for battery longevity.)

But when taking a 1000 mile road trip, that's when you really want full charges along the way. But chargers along the way at public charging stations are typically gonna take too long to charge above 80% (unless your hotel has overnight EV charging, but that's unlikely).
 

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The Fast Lane Car did an interesting test with the Kia Niro going up to Loveland Pass in Colorado. Much of that run was below freezing.
This didn't look too bad to me......
I've driven that I-70 stretch 1000 times. Just a few miles from me.

Interesting that they used a Niro EV. That was high on my radar before the Mach-e was announced. But we still can't get them here. Guess that's why that one had California plates.
 

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I've driven that I-70 stretch 1000 times. Just a few miles from me.

Interesting that they used a Niro EV. That was high on my radar before the Mach-e was announced. But we still can't get them here. Guess that's why that one had California plates.
They plan on using that test on several EVs as they become available. They own a Model X and have already tested it. I thought the Niro would be interesting because it uses similar battery tech as the Mach E.
 

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It really is a Catch-22. 15 hours of overnight 220v charging at home makes it easy to give it a full charge. But we don't really need 100% then because we're not driving anywhere close to max range around town. (I assume we can just set the car to charge to 80% then since it's better for battery longevity.)

But when taking a 1000 mile road trip, that's when you really want full charges along the way. But chargers along the way at public charging stations are typically gonna take too long to charge above 80% (unless your hotel has overnight EV charging, but that's unlikely).
Until the charging network is as big as it is for gas stations, this is where trip planning is going to be crucial.
 

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what it will also take is a bit more planning for those extended road trips. This is where we benefit from Tesla because there are plenty of people out there who have offered up very good suggestions on managing a long-distance road trip. and I can't wait to start posting videos like this with my Mach-E!

 

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what it will also take is a bit more planning for those extended road trips. This is where we benefit from Tesla because there are plenty of people out there who have offered up very good suggestions on managing a long-distance road trip. and I can't wait to start posting videos like this with my Mach-E!

I'd for sure watch videos like this with people in their Mach-E's!
 

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EVs are hear to stay. And they will no doubt improve.
I have a GT in order but also have plenty of questions and concerns.

Small concerns:
- How will the car perform in the sun freezing cold weather?

- Insurance costs?

Big concerns:
  • Repair costs and warranties. Tesla’s are expensive as hell to repair. While the 8 year warranty has been great, many Tesla’s have had multiple motors replaced and battery packs. Outside if warranty, they cost a bundle. How well will Ford stand behind these? And will they do better than Tesla?
  • Resale. That’s a big unknown right now.
I am inclined to lease my GT. Why? It ensures a way out of this product is not ready for prime time. Most people lease Tesla’s or at least did early on for these same reasons. It’s a great way to leverage the tax credit too. While I am not inclined to lease a car and if I did, woukd nktmally not consider putting money down. On a car with a tax credit, I would.
Taking the 7500 tax credit plus another 2500 would lower a lease payment by $275 a month. Naturally though, it depends on how Ford crafts these deals. But doing the math on other similarly priced cars and Tesla’s, I would think a $500 a month lease payment with $10,000 down is what we can expect.
Cold weather will always affect EVs more noticeably than a fossil car, no doubt.

Early Model S (2012-2014ish) had issues with some drive units but by 2016 or so, that seemed to be largely resolved. As for the Mustang Mach-E's motors, I suspect that they're fine for basically ever. Ford has been building electric motors for hybrids for ages so I'm confident that they can either build or source quality electric motors. Additionally, the Mach-E's motors are de-rated. The rear motor at 282hp is capable of another 100hp and the front motor at 50hp is capable of 67hp.

Resale - expect to get hosed. EV technology is advancing in dog years while fossil engines are going nowhere new. The 2025 Mustang Mach-E will be quite different than the 2021 version. Just look at Tesla Model S as an example from 2015 vs. 2019.
 

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Cold weather will always affect EVs more noticeably than a fossil car, no doubt.

Early Model S (2012-2014ish) had issues with some drive units but by 2016 or so, that seemed to be largely resolved. As for the Mustang Mach-E's motors, I suspect that they're fine for basically ever. Ford has been building electric motors for hybrids for ages so I'm confident that they can either build or source quality electric motors. Additionally, the Mach-E's motors are de-rated. The rear motor at 282hp is capable of another 100hp and the front motor at 50hp is capable of 67hp.

Resale - expect to get hosed. EV technology is advancing in dog years while fossil engines are going nowhere new. The 2025 Mustang Mach-E will be quite different than the 2021 version. Just look at Tesla Model S as an example from 2015 vs. 2019.
I've checked the prices of used EVs on sites like Autotrader and it's staggering what the prices are now compared to when they were new.
 
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