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I have ordered an Extended Range Premium. I recently had solar panels installed on the roof. It is typical in these summer months for me to use 25-30 kWh, but to generate 40-50 kWh. I'm a retired, low-milage guy most of the time, and anticipate that at a 270 mile range, I'll only need to recharge once every 2-3 weeks. Can anyone explain to me how many kWh I will use to charge my Extended Range Premium from near-empty to the 80% capacity?

Also- Is the answer the same regardless of Whether I do so from a Level 1 Charger (120v/12amp for 95 hours), a Level 2 charger (240v/32amp 14 hours), or a Level 2 Ford Connected Charge Station (240v/48amp for 10 hours)* These stats are from the brochure for an "Ext Range RWD"- would these charge times be different because my car is AWD?

Lastly, Do I need to drain the battery pretty low before recharging, or can I "top it off" more frequently?
 

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I partially answered in the other forum. As an analogy if you think of voltage as water pressure and current as the thickness of the pipe: at the lower voltage (120v) there is also a narrow pipe (12amp) so not a lot of water gets through per minute. At 240v the water pressure is twice higher, and 32amps equates to over twice as wide a pipe - so the time is more than 6x faster. 48a is an even wider pipe (1.5x), so the time is 1/1.5 x faster than 32amp.
 

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AWD would not impact charge times. It should impact how much power you use when driving though. AWD will drain the battery faster. How fast, I'm not sure. With an ICE car you'd normally say 15%, but with the technology in modern cars I expect they can swap AWD on and off.... so you're only using it when you need it.
 

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I have ordered an Extended Range Premium. I recently had solar panels installed on the roof. It is typical in these summer months for me to use 25-30 kWh, but to generate 40-50 kWh. I'm a retired, low-milage guy most of the time, and anticipate that at a 270 mile range, I'll only need to recharge once every 2-3 weeks. Can anyone explain to me how many kWh I will use to charge my Extended Range Premium from near-empty to the 80% capacity?

Also- Is the answer the same regardless of Whether I do so from a Level 1 Charger (120v/12amp for 95 hours), a Level 2 charger (240v/32amp 14 hours), or a Level 2 Ford Connected Charge Station (240v/48amp for 10 hours)* These stats are from the brochure for an "Ext Range RWD"- would these charge times be different because my car is AWD?

Lastly, Do I need to drain the battery pretty low before recharging, or can I "top it off" more frequently?
This may help. The formulas are same for cars or motorcycles.

 

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I've heard that charging at 240v used ~5% less energy overall. The idea being that because it charges in less time, there is less opportunity for wasted energy (resistance in the copper throughout, less time the onboard charger is running and generating heat, less time for the onboard computer to be on and processing what's going on).

As mentioned above, ideally you keep it between 15% and 80% SOC. But don't stress yourself over it. It doesn't hurt to plug it in for a short amount here and there. Its designed for this. Every time you press on the brakes, you are charging the battery. Ford has a conservative hidden buffer on these. When you need the range, don't feel bad charging to 100% before you leave. Just don't leave it at 100% for weeks outside in summer temperatures.
 

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I've heard that charging at 240v used ~5% less energy overall. The idea being that because it charges in less time, there is less opportunity for wasted energy (resistance in the copper throughout, less time the onboard charger is running and generating heat, less time for the onboard computer to be on and processing what's going on).
Actually, the faster you charge the more heat you will generate because you're pushing more current through the same gauge of wire.
 

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Some other small pieces of advice

Try not to charge it above 80%
Try not to run it down below 15%
So if the car owner is not supposed to charge it above 80% nor reduce the battery below 20%, then actual range will be only 60% of what the EPA will announce. So shouldn’t the EPA reduce it by 40%? What gives?
 

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So if the car owner is not supposed to charge it above 80% nor reduce the battery below 20%, then actual range will be only 60% of what the EPA will announce. So shouldn’t the EPA reduce it by 40%? What gives?
ON A REGULAR BASIS, one should keep the battery SOC in the sweet spot. For occasional longer trips, charging to 100% and draining to 5%-10% is OK. So, the EPA reports what the car CAN do, although the formula is archaically slanted toward ICE from the 80's (48 mph is considered "highway").
 

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SO if the car owner is not supposed to charge it above 80%, then actual range will be only 80% of what the EPA will announce. So shouldn’t they reduce it by 20%?
Ford has about a 10% reserve to protect the battery from degradation, so you can charge above 80% at home when you need to take longer trips. Because of regen, you should stop around 95%. This is to give the regen somewhere to send the energy when you drive away.

You should avoid charging over 80% when using a level 3 DC charging, if possible. It’s also for cost and time reasons, as well as battery longevity.
 

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Ford has about a 10% reserve to protect the battery from degradation, so you can charge above 80% at home when you need to take longer trips. Because of regen, you should stop around 95%. This is to give the regen somewhere to send the energy when you drive away.

You should avoid charging over 80% when using a level 3 DC charging, if possible. It’s also for cost and time reasons, as well as battery longevity.
I think this 80% number only makes sense if Ford didn't have the 10% reserve. My understanding is LiOn's prefer 50% so the farther you deviate the more degredation. Staying in 20 to 80 may be a good compromise. But with Ford's reserved 10%, you can probably do 15 to 85 or even push it to 10 to 90.

In other words, if Ford didn't have the 10%, would you only be doing up to 70%?
 

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I think this 80% number only makes sense if Ford didn't have the 10% reserve. My understanding is LiOn's prefer 50% so the farther you deviate the more degredation. Staying in 20 to 80 may be a good compromise. But with Ford's reserved 10%, you can probably do 15 to 85 or even push it to 10 to 90.

In other words, if Ford didn't have the 10%, would you only be doing up to 70%?
Good question. We could wait to see what Ford’s best charging practices will be.
 

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Some other small pieces of advice

Try not to charge it above 80%
Try not to run it down below 15%
Good advice on lithium ion batteries in general, but I'm not sure it applies when Ford puts so much extra headroom in the batteries (98 kwhr to 89 kwhr, as I recall).

You might be able to go from 0 to 100% on the car's indicator, and only really be going from maybe 5% to 95% on the battery. Maybe...
 

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Good advice on lithium ion batteries in general, but I'm not sure it applies when Ford puts so much extra headroom in the batteries (98 kwhr to 89 kwhr, as I recall).

You might be able to go from 0 to 100% on the car's indicator, and only really be going from maybe 5% to 95% on the battery. Maybe...
I assume that's true as well.... I just hate to assume.
 
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