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Mach-E owners can save up to $13,000 over the span of 5-years according to Ford.
That numbers comes from a cost savings tool they provide that helps to figure what actual numbers might be like, after entering your annual mileage, your annual MPG, fuel price (gallons) and electricity price (kwh). It also factors in the $7,500 federal tax incentive and annual maintenance cost of $285, typical of a gasoline vehicle.
It would be great if everyone can plug in their numbers and compare first year potential savings and savings over 5 years. From that i'm sure we'll find out more accurate averages.

Cost Savings Tool: 2021 Ford® Mustang Mach-E SUV | All-Electric & Exhilarating (scroll to bottom of page)

ford mustang mach-e cost of ownership
 

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Mine shows $8,306/$11,530 (1yr/5yr). But I'm retired and don't drive a lot, making a BEV less advantageous and more of a splurge purchase for me.

Of course, "savings" is a nebulous term here. I normally wouldn't be buying a $60,000 car so it's really costing me more in total. I'd probably be targeting an ICE vehicle in the $35k-$40k range. I just like the idea of having one BEV to pair with one ICE vehicle in the household, and the Mach-e looks like a cool choice. (And we like Ford.)

I probably wouldn't be seriously considering the Mach-e without the $7500 federal tax credit (and the $2500 state tax credit). Also need to remember that the sales tax, registration fees, etc will be based on the full price. $53,700 really becomes $60,000 after D/H, delivery charge, sales tax, and registration. Then subtract the $10k in fed/state tax credits next April.
 

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This calculator doesn't make sense to me.

It doesn't account for the cost of buying the Mach-E vs. your alternative option (keeping existing car, or buying some other car).

It also doesn't let you adjust things like annual maintenance. The only annual maintenance items I can think of that aren't applicable to BEVs are oil changes. That's just once a year for my current car, or about $30 annually for semi-synthetic done at the Ford QuickLane.

Anyway, it shows about $12,000 (in between two of their mileage options) savings over five years for me, for whatever that's worth.
 

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This calculator doesn't make sense to me.

It doesn't account for the cost of buying the Mach-E vs. your alternative option (keeping existing car, or buying some other car).

It also doesn't let you adjust things like annual maintenance. The only annual maintenance items I can think of that aren't applicable to BEVs are oil changes. That's just once a year for my current car, or about $30 annually for semi-synthetic done at the Ford QuickLane.

Anyway, it shows about $12,000 (in between two of their mileage options) savings over five years for me, for whatever that's worth.
mine is based on 25,000 miles and 3.77 for gas which is WAY higher here.
 

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Clean Technica tried to calculate the cost of ownership for the Mach-E compared to the Ford Escape.


15,000 miles a year, $2.50 gas, $0.13 electricity/charging
This is an attempt at a fairly typical lifestyle without extreme changes in the coming 5 years.

1958


25,000 miles a year, $3.50 gas, $0.13 electricity/charging
Assume you drive quite a lot, live in California where gas is more expensive (or live somewhere else and gas prices just go up a lot again), and have a modest price of electricity (a mix of lower-cost nighttime charging, some home daytime charging, and some charging at not-super-cheap EV charging stations). Here’s one potential scenario for you.

1959


10,000 miles a year, $2.00 gas, $0.07 electricity/charging
Say that you don’t drive a ton and you have a rooftop solar PV system with electricity to spare. Say you have a lot of free EV charging in your area. Say you’re just really good at optimizing your charging for low cost. This is a potential scenario for you. You could go much lower for a really low-cost charging option — I’ve spent $0 charging in 2 years of EV ownership in Florida (one year with the BMW i3 and one with the Tesla Model 3). However, some commenters will probably treat my head like a gumball and chew it off if I use such a scenario here. Look at your own situation and consider what you’d probably pay.

This scenario also assumes a lower price of gas than the above scenarios — approximately the average price of gas in Florida today, with no significant change in the coming 5 years.

1960
 

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Interesting comparison. Of course, he leaves out the biggest difference -- whether a BEV is a good fit for the buyer at all. First and foremost: Does their residence have easy and dependable overnight charging capability? The answer is usually polar opposite for someone living in an apartment than it is for someone with a house w/garage.

Also, does their driving include much road tripping? Charging at retail stations is a COMPLETELY different deal than easy and cheap home charging.

And, do they have a 2nd car in the household? One BEV and one ICE/PHEV is the ideal scenario.
 

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I note that the 5 year residual for the MachE is 43% assuming 15,000 miles per year. This may be extremely optimistic.

Presently the Ford "Option Plan" at 10,000 miles per year, 5,000 miles per year less, after 3 years not 5 years, has a buyback (residual) of 43%.
 

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This is what I got . . . I drive 30K miles a year for work. I found it interesting that the numbers don't change based on AWD or RWD, which they should because the range is less, so it should be less miles per KWH.
1961
 

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A couple of minor points:

  • The MSRP of the First Edition is $60,400 not $59,300. The $59,300 does not include destination charge. This reduces the potential savings by $1,100 to $18,080.
  • Regular gas is now about $2.00 a gallon not $2.64 and of course no one knows where gas prices will be over the next 5 years. If more EV come on board and more renewables are used gas prices might stay at $2.00 or they could go up.
  • Depreciation: What are using for a residual, value of the First Edition after 5 years? In any ICE vs. BEV savings comparison you must consider the depreciation.
  • What car are you comparing the First Edition to? The MSRP of the car, the actual selling price and the value at the end of 5 years? Remember most cars are sold at a substantial discount to MSRP, while the MachE presently being sold at full MSRP.
This analysis only takes into the savings of the cost of energy - electricity vs. gas.

For a true analysis of potential savings, you need to know the cost of depreciation of both the ICE and the BEV. For example if the First Edition holds 43% of its value, $25,972 that is a depreciation expense of $34,428.

A fully loaded AWD Ford Escape has a MSRP of $32,655 including destination charges. Assuming 5% off of list, that is $31,000. Assuming after 5 years, it has retained only 35% of MSRP vs. 43% of the First Edition, that is $11,429 so the depreciation component is the difference between selling price $31,000 and value after 5 years, $11,429, $19,570.

So the depreciation expense of the First Edition vs. the Ford Escape is an additional $14,857 in favor of the Escape.

Tax: Sales tax is based on selling price: on the First Edition, $60,400, in NY where I live the tax rate is 8.625%, the tax is $5,210. The tax on the Ford Escape, selling price of $31,000 is $2,674.

So the tax component on the First Edition is an additional $2,356.

When the additional tax and depreciation is taken together this is an additional $17,393 wiping out most of the "potential" savings.

Maintenance: Over 75,000 miles the Escape will need 10 oil and filter changes @$35 each an additional $350. Tires on the Escape will be cheaper than than the First Edition. From my conversations with owners of Tesla's tires last less than 20,000 miles mainly because people tend to drive an EV because of its performance harder than a typical SUV. The additional cost of tires will more than offset the cost of oil/filter changes. There will be air filters to change on both cars. So I do not see any major savings on maintenance.

Your potential savings is based on driving 15,000 miles per year. Of course is you drive only 10,000 miles or less per year as I do, there will be no savings at all.

Finally, and again a minor point, if you take into account "use of money" for 5 years at just 2%, on the difference of sales price of the two cars, $29,400 that is an additional $2,940.

I am getting the First Edition not because it is cheaper, where I live electricity is $.23 per KW, so it will actually be more expensive not less, but because I want:

  • I want to go "green"
  • I want the experience of driving an EV
  • I would rather be driving a First Edition than a Ford Escape!
 

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A fully loaded AWD Ford Escape has a MSRP of $32,655 including destination charges. Assuming 5% off of list, that is $31,000. Assuming after 5 years, it has retained only 35% of MSRP vs. 43% of the First Edition, that is $11,429 so the depreciation component is the difference between selling price $31,000 and value after 5 years, $11,429, $19,570.

Maintenance: Over 75,000 miles the Escape will need 10 oil and filter changes @$35 each an additional $350. Tires on the Escape will be cheaper than than the First Edition. From my conversations with owners of Tesla's tires last less than 20,000 miles mainly because people tend to drive an EV because of its performance harder than a typical SUV. The additional cost of tires will more than offset the cost of oil/filter changes. There will be air filters to change on both cars. So I do not see any major savings on maintenance.
I'm not sure where you got that price of a fully loaded Escape . . . because I come up with over $40K. The only thing I think it has that the MME FE won't have (and I could not delete) was the trailer towing package. Otherwise, IMO, fairly comparable. As to maintenance costs . . . I LOVE my Escape. It has been my favorite car over the years, and I DO drive more than average (90% highway miles), but at about 103,000 miles, I had to have the waste valve and the entire turbo replaced. Almost $3,000 in repairs. I also recently had to have the bushing on the shifter replaced when the car would not change gears, another $250 . . . and have spent probably another $600 to my recollection replacing brakes. While my experiences may not be average, to think all you are going to do is change the oil is probably wishful thinking.
1962
 

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I agree there will be other maintenance: brakes for example, but that will true as well for the MachE.

Did you have any major repairs before 75,000 miles?

The Ford Escape I priced out was the SEL: When I went beyond that, all I saw were hybrids, I did not know about the Titanium which is my error. Sorry for the error.

I agree the Titanium is more comparable to the First Edition.

I did not include the Premium package as that includes "heads up display" and other options not on the First Edition.

The price I got, before any negotiations is $37,575.

see: https://shop.ford.com/build/escape/?gnav=vhpnav#/config/Config[|Ford|Escape|2020|1|1.|401A.U9J..UX...TITANIUM.RTL.999.]

If I adjust my figures to the Titanium, then I agree over 5 years, 75,000 miles, assuming your electricity is at $.13 KW and gas stays at $2.64 the First Edition will be cheaper, but nowhere near a savings $18,000.
 

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I agree there will be other maintenance: brakes for example, but that will true as well for the MachE.

Did you have any major repairs before 75,000 miles?
Yes, brakes. So about $600. And brakes will NOT be the same for the MME. My experience with our Fusion Energi is that with regenerative braking, wear and tear on brakes is significantly diminished.

And I was the dope who paid an extra $1,000 for the extended warranty because I knew the mileage I was going to accumulate. The major repairs happened at 103,000. I included the premium package because while the Escape has a HUD, it does not have a 15" screen, and some of the other "goodies" that the MME has because of that screen. I think that is a fair trade off. And, I guess I have to look at it through my use case which is higher mileage than most.

BTW . . . my Escape is a 2016. I like the looks of the back of the 2020, but NOT a fan of the front end look of the 2020 Escape. I really think they messed up the grille and it looks a bit "dopey". Anyone else?
 

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BTW . . . my Escape is a 2016. I like the looks of the back of the 2020, but NOT a fan of the front end look of the 2020 Escape. I really think they messed up the grille and it looks a bit "dopey". Anyone else?
100% agree. First time I saw a picture of the 2020 Escape I said "Damn, they ruined it!". The 2013-2019 version (I have two 2013's) looks quite nice. But the front of the new one looks small and frumpy. Makes the whole vehicle look diminished to me.
 

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Update using Ford X-Plan pricing for the First Edition and Edmunds/KBB.com for the Ford Escape Titanium AWD with upgraded turbo Engine assuming 15,000 miles per year, gas $2.64 per gallon and electricity at $.13 per KWH for 5 years.

Depreciation expense:

First Edition using X-Plan pricing: MSRP less 2% plus $275 administrative fee: $60,400 less 2%, $1208 plus $275 discount of $933, total cost $59,467:

The residual, balloon payment under the Ford Option Plan, after 3 years and 10,000 miles per year is 43%. However, this car will be 2 years older and have 45,000 more miles on it. If we assume the value to be 40%, $24,160, the depreciation is $35,307.

From Edmunds the MSRP of the Ford Escape, including destination charges is $38,080 and can be bought at $33,836.

see: Ford Escape Build & Price - Build Your Own Ford | Edmunds

Accoding to KBB.com a 5 year old Ford Escape Titanium, with 75,000 miles, in good condition (not very good or excellent but good) is worth $14,000 and the depreciation expense is $19,836.

see: https://www.kbb.com/ford/escape/2015/titanium-sport-utility-4d/?vehicleid=400274&mileage=15000&modalview=false&intent=trade-in-sell&pricetype=trade-in&condition=good&options=6395001|true


Use of money at 2% for five years:

  • Ford Escape $3,383
  • Ford First Edition $5,946
Maintenance:

Two set of tires for the First Edition, @$175 per tire, $1,400
Two set of tires for the Ford Escape @$125 per tire, $1,000

Ford Escape: Oil and Filter 10 changes, every 7,500 miles @$35, $350
Ford Escape: set of brakes $600
Ford Escape: Miscellaneous $500

Gas vs. Electricity:

Ford First Edition:

98 KWH batter gives a range of 270 miles. That means each KW gives 2.75 miles. Total miles 75,000, 27,272 KW @ $.13 per KW, cost of electricity is $3545.

Ford First Edition installation of 240 volt, 32 amp charger $500

Ford Escape: 25 mpg, 75,000 miles 3,000 gallons @$2.64 per gallon, total cost of fuel is $7,920.

Sales Tax:

First Edition, selling price of $59,467 NYS tax @8.635% $5,129

Ford Escape Titanium, selling price $33,830 tax @ 8.625% $2,918

First Edition:

  • Depreciation: $ 35,307
  • Use of Money: 5,946
  • Maintenance 1,000
  • Electricity 3,345
  • 240 32 amp charger 500
  • Taxes 5,129
  • Federal Tax credit <7,500>
  • NY State tax credit <2,000>
Total Cost, 5 years, 15,000 miles per year: $41,727

Ford Escape Titanium:


  • Depreciation: $ 19,836
  • Use of money 3,383
  • Maintenance 2,450
  • Gas 7,920
  • Taxes 2,198
Total cost, 5 years, 15,000 miles per year, $35,787

Total savings in favor of the Ford Escape, 15,000 miles per year, 5 years: $5,940!


As per my original post, I am not getting the First Edition to save money (it will actually cost substantially more ) - and as I drive less than 10,000 miles per year the difference will be even greater.

I am getting the First Edition because:

  • I do want to go green
  • I do want to experience of driving an EV
  • I do not want to drive a Ford Escape: I want to drive a First Edition!
 

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Good analysis. You could throw one more item into that 5-year plan... EA charging. Let's say, 2000 miles/yr worth (mostly road trips, and maybe a few away-from home recharges in unusual situations). 5 years is 10,000 miles. At roughly 3 miles/kWh on road trips speeds, that's 3333 kWh. At EA Pass+ subscription pricing, that's usually $0.69/kWh, or $0.56/kWh above what you already included at home rates. Thus an extra $1866.

A non-issue for those that won't take the MME on road trips, but many say they plan to.

EDITED: I have an error in there. It's $0.69 per minute, not per kWh. MME is supposed to add 47 miles per 10 minutes of charge (average), so about $0.15 per mile. Home rates are about $0.03 per mile, thus a $0.12 difference x 10,000 miles = $1200.
 

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Thanks for your kind remarks.

Actually to be precise, you would have to deduct the cost of the 10,000 miles at $.13 per KWH: If you using 10,000 miles on the road, then you would not need to charge the 10,000 miles at home.

10,000 miles @2.75 miles per KWH, is 3636 KHW @ $13 per KWH, savings of $472 to be deducted from the $1,866.

Also I think that with the First Edition, there may be free miles at Electrify American: if that is the case, then $472 must be deducted from the electricity cost.

One final item which I did not put into my analysis: electricity on Long Island where I live is not $.13 per KWH but almost double that, $.23 per KWH. If I use my cost of $.23 per KWH then most of the electricity savings vs. gasoline are gone.

If you use certain chargers like Juice Box, between 11 PM and 6 AM the cost drops to $.18 per KWH. There is also a $500 rebate for Juice Box.

So far the Ford mobile charger, 32 amp, that comes with the MachE is not included in the list for either rebates or price reduction in KWH rates. Hopefully this will change soon!

Otherwise it will be cheaper to pay for the Juice Box, take the $500 credit and take advantage of the reduce KWH rate.
 

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Thanks for your kind remarks.

Actually to be precise, you would have to deduct the cost of the 10,000 miles at $.13 per KWH: If you using 10,000 miles on the road, then you would not need to charge the 10,000 miles at home.

10,000 miles @2.75 miles per KWH, is 3636 KHW @ $13 per KWH, savings of $472 to be deducted from the $1,866.

Also I think that with the First Edition, there may be free miles at Electrify American: if that is the case, then $472 must be deducted from the electricity cost.

One final item which I did not put into my analysis: electricity on Long Island where I live is not $.13 per KWH but almost double that, $.23 per KWH. If I use my cost of $.23 per KWH then most of the electricity savings vs. gasoline are gone.

If you use certain chargers like Juice Box, between 11 PM and 6 AM the cost drops to $.18 per KWH. There is also a $500 rebate for Juice Box.

So far the Ford mobile charger, 32 amp, that comes with the MachE is not included in the list for either rebates or price reduction in KWH rates. Hopefully this will change soon!

Otherwise it will be cheaper to pay for the Juice Box, take the $500 credit and take advantage of the reduce KWH rate.
A quick question, is the $7,500 Federal Tax Credit in your calculations?
Just wondering, so i can adjust to my situation here in NJ (such as removing sales tax).
 

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OPPS! My mistake and thanks for catching it!

I failed to take into consideration:

  • Federal Tax credit of $7,500
  • NY State Tax Credit of $2,000
I will go back and revise my post to reflect these two credits.

Of course if you live in NJ there may not be any sales tax: we have sales tax in NY, but we also have a $2,000 credit.

Again, thanks for catching this omission!

My mistake.


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My stupid comment. I bought the FE because it was fully loaded. I would NEVER have considered the Escape. I currently drive a Fusion Sport Titanium. They only made them for a few very short years. So to compare the MME with the Escape only works if you would actually buy the escape. I maybe out if the norm but I doubt many FE buyers would even consider the escape.

As to costs I live in Cali and gas is 3.13 a gallon. This is actually a low figure. For Cali. I drive around 25,000 miles a year. This does NOT include road trips. I will be able to charge at home at $0.13 per gallon. I do NOT care about depreciation because that only matters if you are selling. When you drive 25,000 miles up and over the mountains to get to LA there are major breaks in cell service. As such I do not want my wife and daughter sitting on the side of the freeway at night. In short I end up trading cars in with negative equity about 2 years before the payments are up. I view the MME as a purchase that will actually last beyond the payments. In short the savings is insane as I am no longer worried about miles and wear and tear.

I am doing the Ford Option at 4 years because I think there will be better batteries available by then that get say 400-500 miles per charge. Now if I can simply replace old batteries with new ones then I will do that instead. If you are looking at depreciation why in the heck are you buying a BEV that will likely get 500,000 miles??
 
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