Mach-E Forum | Ford Mustang Mach-E Forum and News banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
106 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I assume that the MME's top speed will be limited by software.

Does anyone know what that speed will be?

Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Reserved First Edition Rapid Red Metallic
Joined
·
725 Posts
Very few places. None where there is any other traffic.

I think that I dislike the idea of an artificial restriction more than the actual reality...
Remember with higher speed you must have different tires.

Those tires will affect ride, mileage and may not wear as long plus are more expensive to replace.

So I am all for limiting the speed!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,224 Posts
Very few places. None where there is any other traffic.

I think that I dislike the idea of an artificial restriction more than the actual reality...
Being a single-speed transmission, I think its more a mechanical limitation rather than an arbitrary restriction.

I assume the GT will have a higher top speed, possibly two gears like the Porsche Tycan electric.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
106 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Remember with higher speed you must have different tires.

Those tires will affect ride, mileage and may not wear as long plus are more expensive to replace.

So I am all for limiting the speed!
Okay. I am pretty sure that your opinion is in the majority on this.

No problem. It's a minor issue with me.

I was mostly curious when I asked, since different vehicles have different top speed limitations, and Teslas, as far as I can tell, have none. So I find the topic interesting...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
106 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Being a single-speed transmission, I think its more a mechanical limitation rather than an arbitrary restriction.

I assume the GT will have a higher top speed, possibly two gears like the Porsche Tycan electric.
Possibly.

But in real life, when you reach top speed, the speed falls off very quickly, at least in other Fords, and it is clear that it is a speed limiter that is doing it.

I haven't driven the MME, so I don't know in this case. But since the Tesla top speeds are much higher, well, I suspect artificial limitation is at work.
 

·
Registered
Reserved First Edition Rapid Red Metallic
Joined
·
725 Posts
Okay. I am pretty sure that your opinion is in the majority on this.

No problem. It's a minor issue with me.

I was mostly curious when I asked, since different vehicles have different top speed limitations, and Teslas, as far as I can tell, have none. So I find the topic interesting...
Actually no: If you go to the Tesla web site, you will see that the top speed is limited.

If you go to the Tesla boards you will see all the comments on tire life. Tires that are rated at 130/150 mph have a shorter tread life, give a poorer ride and are more expensive than tires rated at 115 mph.

Top speed, like 0-60 are "bragging rights" nothing more: I never intend to race my car and have driven over 120 mph twice: In 1968 on I-95 in Florida on my 1966 Mustang GT, had it floored at 5 AM and hit 124 and watched the temperature gauge climb dramatically and in 1999 on I-91 in New Hampshire at 130 in my BMW 740iL.

Since then my top speed has been under 110 mph
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
106 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Actually no: If you go to the Tesla web site, you will see that the top speed is limited.

If you go to the Tesla boards you will see all the comments on tire life. Tires that are rated at 130/150 mph have a shorter tread life, give a poorer ride and are more expensive than tires rated at 115 mph.

Top speed, like 0-60 are "bragging rights" nothing more: I never intend to race my car and have driven over 120 mph twice: In 1968 on I-95 in Florida on my 1966 Mustang GT, had it floored at 5 AM and hit 124 and watched the temperature gauge climb dramatically and in 1999 on I-91 in New Hampshire at 130 in my BMW 740iL.

Since then my top speed has been under 110 mph
Interesting. What are the Tesla top speeds?

I always thought that they were advertised as high enough that they weren't limited.
 

·
Registered
Reserved First Edition Rapid Red Metallic
Joined
·
725 Posts
Interesting. What are the Tesla top speeds?

I always thought that they were advertised as high enough that they weren't limited.
From Tesla.com

  • Model S 155 mph
  • Model X 155 mph
  • Model 3 140 mph
  • Model Y 135 mph
As I posted you need tires with speed range capability of 150/175 mph. Those tires, V and Z rated are extremely expensive to replace as compared to T rated (118 mph) that I assume will be on the MachE.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
106 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Actually no: If you go to the Tesla web site, you will see that the top speed is limited.

If you go to the Tesla boards you will see all the comments on tire life. Tires that are rated at 130/150 mph have a shorter tread life, give a poorer ride and are more expensive than tires rated at 115 mph.

Top speed, like 0-60 are "bragging rights" nothing more: I never intend to race my car and have driven over 120 mph twice: In 1968 on I-95 in Florida on my 1966 Mustang GT, had it floored at 5 AM and hit 124 and watched the temperature gauge climb dramatically and in 1999 on I-91 in New Hampshire at 130 in my BMW 740iL.

Since then my top speed has been under 110 mph
I went to the Tesla site and couldn't find it. A google search gave 162 mph for the Model 3, but the link didn't confirm it. Odd.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
106 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
From Tesla.com

  • Model S 155 mph
  • Model X 155 mph
  • Model 3 140 mph
  • Model Y 135 mph
As I posted you need tires with speed range capability of 150/175 mph. Those tires, V and Z rated are extremely expensive to replace as compared to T rated (118 mph) that I assume will be on the MachE.
Good job. I couldn't find it.

Those speeds could be limited, I suppose. They seem mostly high enough to be physical limitations, as opposed to artificial, but, again, I really can't say for sure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
140 Posts
where in the US do you plan to drive faster than 111?
At the drag strip or any race track. My Livewire has a top speed of 115mph and it is software limited. The Energica motorcycle has a top speed of 150mph. I plan to take my MME to the street nights at the local drag strip. Got to have some fun on theses EVs. Go to the video section and see a Livewire race a Tesla Model 3.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
140 Posts
Being a single-speed transmission, I think its more a mechanical limitation rather than an arbitrary restriction.

I assume the GT will have a higher top speed, possibly two gears like the Porsche Tycan electric.
Street EVs do not need multiple gearing. Hope Ford does not add that to the MME-GT. As for the Porsche Taycan? Marketing! Listening to the sales people instead of engineers. Why is the top of the line called the Taycan Turbo? Here is a video to explain gears on an EV:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
107 Posts
Being a single-speed transmission, I think its more a mechanical limitation rather than an arbitrary restriction.

I assume the GT will have a higher top speed, possibly two gears like the Porsche Tycan electric.
Highly doubt GT will have a two speed transmission. It is not needed as electric motors have gobs of torque at any speed. Ron Heiser of Ford said they did not consider it for this vehicle as it would add a lot of cost and complexity at reduced efficiency. One of the Ford rear axles actually goes through the center of the motor! The motor and axles are all in a straight line. My reference for this is an interview by David Tracy of Jalopnik with Ron Heiser at the LA auto show in December of 2019. I don't have a link handy but could find it. David also has a seperate article with a deep dive into the engineering of the MME with lots of pictures.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,224 Posts
Highly doubt GT will have a two speed transmission. It is not needed as electric motors have gobs of torque at any speed. Ron Heiser of Ford said they did not consider it for this vehicle as it would add a lot of cost and complexity at reduced efficiency. One of the Ford rear axles actually goes through the center of the motor! The motor and axles are all in a straight line. My reference for this is an interview by David Tracy of Jalopnik with Ron Heiser at the LA auto show in December of 2019. I don't have a link handy but could find it. David also has a seperate article with a deep dive into the engineering of the MME with lots of pictures.
I remember the interview. It was with Jalopnik.
The higher RPMs remove the need for multiple gears. But the more RPMs, the more energy burned. You will also hit peak power fairly quickly (Teslas around 70mph before drop-off), and eventually you will reach the max RPMs.
I wonder if a light-weight, multi-speed transmission would get more efficiency by not needing to maintain the motor at high RPMs when traveling at speed (like an over-drive)?
 

·
Registered
Reserved First Edition Rapid Red Metallic
Joined
·
725 Posts
I remember the interview. It was with Jalopnik.
The higher RPMs remove the need for multiple gears. But the more RPMs, the more energy burned. You will also hit peak power fairly quickly (Teslas around 70mph before drop-off), and eventually you will reach the max RPMs.
I wonder if a light-weight, multi-speed transmission would get more efficiency by not needing to maintain the motor at high RPMs when traveling at speed (like an over-drive)?
Are you sure that an electric motor is more efficient at low RPM vs. higher RPM. I know that an ICE has an efficient range where max hp and Max torque combine to be most efficient.

But I thought an electric motor's efficiency was fairly constant and that is the reason for not using multiple gears which would add:

  • add weight
  • complexity
On the race circuit for BEV, I forget what they call it for cars, about 90% do not use a gears while I think only 10% do, because of the extra weight and complexity so using gears does not positively effect efficiency.


.
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top