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Once we get our MMEs I'll have to see if my $100, 1kW 110 power system works. It's fine on the Leaf. I'll just need to access the 12v battery on the MME and make sure it back-charges properly. On the Leaf it would provide power for over a day. Should get 3 1/2 days at least at full power.
 

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Isaias knocked our power out for ~14 Hours.

MME extended range battery = 88KWh
Average US household electricity consumption = 29KWh

Running just the "necessities" - fridge, lighting, internet... We could probably hold out for a week or more.
If you don't have an ICE vehicle, I guess you have to watch to make sure you don't use it all up, or else you will be completely immobile too.
 

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If you don't have an ICE vehicle, I guess you have to watch to make sure you don't use it all up, or else you will be completely immobile too.
We have a bank of DCFCs a couple of miles away. Just need enough to limp over for a recharge.
 

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Same with gas pumps, right? Or do gas stations typically have gas backup generators?
Many gas stations are completely out. A few are still open where there is electrical service.
It’s so bad by me they are talking ETA Sunday. Glad i’m getting solar w/battery backup before end-of-year. I’m so done with dealing with this.
 

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Same with gas pumps, right? Or do gas stations typically have gas backup generators?
Not likely. Maybe they have changed but back in 2003 when there was that massive blackout on the Eastern Seaboard, gas stations were not operational.
 

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In a natural disaster those may not be operational.
True but many of these are located along major commerce corridors with primary electrical trunks and come back on line much faster than neighborhoods. Remember that in most neighborhoods restoration is often a block by block process due to downed trees. They don't even start there until the main trunk lines are up -- there's no sense reconnecting to a dead trunk line.

The nearest bank of DCFCs to me is along a major road and is in the lot of a hotel, around the corner from a Home Depot, an auto dealership, and many offices. You'll bet that's a priority line. If the line is up, the chargers probably will be as well.
 

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are there any signs that MME will support bi directional charging?
If so that would change everything for me, i still have a reservation for a ModelY and a MME, but if the MME will support that, he is for sure the winner. I just got an offer for a battery for my existing solar and it is not cheap. If i could use the MME as a house battery, that would be great.
 

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They probably don't. But it's very easy to truck in a tanker of gas.
Right, but I mean the pumps themselves require electricity to pump and for payment processing. But maybe in an emergency they'd instead 'pump' directly from a tanker to cars, similar to what Tesla sets up for Thanksgiving weekend charge rushes?
 

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Right, but I mean the pumps themselves require electricity to pump and for payment processing. But maybe in an emergency they'd instead 'pump' directly from a tanker to cars, similar to what Tesla sets up for Thanksgiving weekend charge rushes?
Right. There would be different levels of emergency for sure.

I think its something to be aware of. If I lived in a place prone to natural disaster I would have my own generator as I wouldn't want to rely on a single point of failure (the car) for both living at home and transportation. They don't use electric cars in the Walking Dead...
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Right. There would be different levels of emergency for sure.

I think its something to be aware of. If I lived in a place prone to natural disaster I would have my own generator as I wouldn't want to rely on a single point of failure (the car) for both living at home and transportation. They don't use electric cars in the Walking Dead...
In an apocalypse scenario, electric with solar or wind would be much more preferable to gasoline.

For the more "normal" scenario. The generator too is a single point of failure. Thanks to ethanol, countless people have found the carburetor gummed up because they didn't drain/run their generator/power equipment dry prior to storage. These are the same guys who have no idea that gasoline has a shelf life.... Not uncommon for people to siphon gas out of their cars to run their generators. I always recommend to anyone buying small generators to get the dual fuel or propane version and run them off of propane.

The small ones most people get are good in a pinch for the water pump (well), fridge, and boiler but were I to live in a place which lost power often, I would opt for a larger diesel/fuel oil version with a transfer switch... $10K or more... so having bidirectional charging capabilities to make additional use of an asset that you already have (BEV), just makes too much sense not to want it quicker.
 

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Right. There would be different levels of emergency for sure.

I think its something to be aware of. If I lived in a place prone to natural disaster I would have my own generator as I wouldn't want to rely on a single point of failure (the car) for both living at home and transportation. They don't use electric cars in the Walking Dead...
Just to point out, the single point of failure is the power connected to the grid. We're talking about using the car as a backup in case of that failure. You're now discussing a backup, or failover, system.
 

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Just to point out, the single point of failure is the power connected to the grid. We're talking about using the car as a backup in case of that failure. You're now discussing a backup, or failover, system.
Yep... and the EV is used practically every day with regular maintenance while for most people the generator collects dust in the corner of the garage. If my life depended on it... I take the EV with bidirectional charging any day over the ICE generator.
 

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Just to point out, the single point of failure is the power connected to the grid. We're talking about using the car as a backup in case of that failure. You're now discussing a backup, or failover, system.
All I'm trying to point out is in an emergency, transportation and power are important. And folks should be careful to sacrifice one for the other.

That's all, just food for thought.
 

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All I'm trying to point out is in an emergency, transportation and power are important. And folks should be careful to sacrifice one for the other.

That's all, just food for thought.
So true.

As mentioned earlier, I ordered Powerwall (added to solar order). Not only does it help in emergencies, it can be used to assist the grid, too. This is without sacrificing emergency transportation.

It is expensive endeavor. I justified the cost because i was already pursuing solar, i also need a new roof, and i had already saved to install a permanent NG whole-house generator (switching this to powerwall). So, convinced the wife to let us dig a little deeper and do it all at the same time (Isaias help me with this argument).

Something for the industry to consider, to reduce the cost of whole-house battery backup, can they sell cheaper systems using viable batteries from cars taken out of service? Giving them a second-life and further offsetting impact of battery-production on the environment? Thoughts?
 
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