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2021 MME Premium Ext 2WD Infinite Blue
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In Atlanta, GA. Just signed up for Georgia Power's PEV Rate Plan:

$.01/kWh during "Super Off-Peak" 11pm-7am every day which is 33% of the hours in a year.
$.07/kWh for regular "Off Peak" which is about 66% of the hours in a year (not Super Off-Peak or On Peak times)
$.20/kWh for On-Peak. 2pm-7pm from June-September which is 5% of the hours in a year.

I plan on scheduling to take advantage of lowest rates using FordPass orJuicenet App - I recently installed a JuiceBox40 EVSE for which GA Power is sending me a $250 rebate.
 

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$.08 kWh 24/7 with Clark PUD in SW WA, no TOU options available.

Have had the same rate for 10 years, though I expect that to increase 50-100% over the next 10 years as demand growth will far exceed supply growth as coal and NG get banned in the NW.
 

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I expect that to increase 50-100% over the next 10 years as demand growth will far exceed supply growth as coal and NG get banned in the NW.
Coal is pretty much closed out in OR and currently provides very little power and will be fully closed in a couple years.

NG won't be banned but used for the peak load coverage.

OR can easily provide 100% with wind and solar with the energy farms mostly in Eastern OR. Add in solar panels on all buildings, some wind generators on top of the higher ones, battery storage for both end users and utility grade. We have tidal power generation experiment going on now also. Wind generates so much power that Bonneville is turning them off so it can sell more expensive hydro to CA. Average home in OR can run the house and charge the car with solar panels.

OR has to cut down on the hydro as we went too far and its killing off the salmon and the rivers. Proposal in Congress now with bipartisan support to take down the Snake River dams. Lots of smaller tributary dams are down and more are coming down all the time.

On the cost, wind and solar are cheap, battery backup relatively expensive
 

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Hopefully we can keep NG fire peakers on the grid, but as NG IS being banned from new home construction, there will be higher demand for electricity. I'm all for cleaner energy, but maybe we get the new sources online before removing existing.

 

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NG IS being banned from new home construction, there will be higher demand for electricity
"The updates do not apply to single family homes or low-rise multifamily homes, as the state prohibits city amendments to the residential energy code."

NG is not being banned from new homes though there was a upgrade to building code requiring solar power on all homes, not sure where that stands. That would make the most sense. If we have to get to 90% reduction in 28 years, then we need to be aggressive now.

The Seattle code is for buildings over 3 stories to use clean energy. What a great use of Bezos and Gates money, making all the Amazon and MS buildings zero net energy. In most cases, it is a good long term investment. The fact that it is a long term investment is why it doesn't get more traction. The code requiring it will help.

But to the end case, the solar and wind in the NW can do it all with a bit of battery backup so that's where we should be going. Only 28 years to go.
 

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In Atlanta, GA. Just signed up for Georgia Power's PEV Rate Plan:

$.01/kWh during "Super Off-Peak" 11pm-7am every day which is 33% of the hours in a year.
$.07/kWh for regular "Off Peak" which is about 66% of the hours in a year (not Super Off-Peak or On Peak times)
$.20/kWh for On-Peak. 2pm-7pm from June-September which is 5% of the hours in a year.

I plan on scheduling to take advantage of lowest rates using FordPass orJuicenet App - I recently installed a JuiceBox40 EVSE for which GA Power is sending me a $250 rebate.
I'm down in Columbus and I'm just going to keep the flat rate at 0.057 cents kwh. Reading some of the other rates, this seems to be at least one thing GA has going for it. It's a shame they charge a $213 a year use tax for EV and got rid of all the tax credits.
 
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I thought of a question that its answer might prove interesting, and perhaps even useful:What are you paying in your area for electricity per kWh? Include all charges reflected on your bill. (Distribution Service, Generation, Transmission, Fuel, Sales & use surcharge, taxes, and anything else you might be charged for on your bill. Also please include your general area in the US. Also, Does your utility offer a discount for EV's

For me in central Va = .13 per kWh
In Northwest Arkansas (Fayetteville, Bentonville, Rogers, Springdale, etc) we pay about $0.10 per kWh - very reasonable. But Arkansas offers no EV incentives and in fact punishes EV owners with a $200 per year additional tax on EVs and $100 per year on hybrids. The big issue I have is the cost of electricity at the public recharging stations - most in excess of $0.30 per kWh and some charge by the minute concealing their power costs. Changes are needed in order for EVs to be truly cost effective. BTW - I live my new Mach-E 🙂
 

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I live in SE Michigan and my utility (DTE) offers dynamic pricing depending on time of day. Here’s the breakdown for low peak (when I plan to charge).

Off peak $0.01218
Power supply $0.03576
Cost recovery $0.003220
Distribution $0.06611
Total $0.11727
I live in Ann Arbor and have the same rate. I have an electrician hired to install a separate meter and dedicated 60-amp circuit for my Level 2 charger. DTE will reimburse $500 for the install (which covers a large fraction of the charger) and there's a $1,000 federal tax credit that covers a percentage of the electrical installation costs (this will cover a significant chunk of my install costs for the new meter, breaker, and related wiring).

The DTE rate of $0.11/kWh applies from 11:00 p.m. - 7:00 a.m.
 

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Too many charges and fees to list. Supposedly $17.00/mo for service, 0.07/kWH for delivery. 0.027 for supply and 0.025 for “renewable source,” and 0.017 for ESRM (??), meaning my supply should cost 6.7 cents/kWH. All said it adds up to about 0.14/kWH plus $17 basic connection fee. Total bill is $95 for 543 kW.
I am a National Grid customer in Northern NY (Southern Canadia). Luckily I generate almost all my own power with a 94 kW solar array. Or I did. I am sure that adding the Mach-E means I’ll be buying more power this year. But it will still be better than buying gas.
It only matters what your incremental rate is, along with its tax rate (i.e.what your kwh costs you for the Mach-E charging). Anything else relates to what is paid to keep your house electrified.
 

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I thought of a question that its answer might prove interesting, and perhaps even useful:What are you paying in your area for electricity per kWh? Include all charges reflected on your bill. (Distribution Service, Generation, Transmission, Fuel, Sales & use surcharge, taxes, and anything else you might be charged for on your bill. Also please include your general area in the US. Also, Does your utility offer a discount for EV's

For me in central Va = .13 per kWh
I live in Southern California and there are many rate plans to choose from. My rate plan “time of use B “ charges me 12 cents per KWH between 10pm and 8am. Rates are as high as 50 cents per KWH at peak charge hours between 2pm and 10 pm. So I charge my Mach E x4 only between 10pm and 8 am
 

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Walla Walla, Wa. .077 daytime and .073 nighttime but I get a .54 credit for every kWh I produce. Last month power bill was $19.64 for 403kWh used. I get the credit as a rebate annually limited to $5,000. This number will go down as this provision sunsets in 2030.

MME delivery scheduled for March 4th
 

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I thought of a question that its answer might prove interesting, and perhaps even useful:What are you paying in your area for electricity per kWh? Include all charges reflected on your bill. (Distribution Service, Generation, Transmission, Fuel, Sales & use surcharge, taxes, and anything else you might be charged for on your bill. Also please include your general area in the US. Also, Does your utility offer a discount for EV's

For me in central Va = .13 per kWh
$0.15/KWh Northern Indiana. No off peak rates or rebates with NIPSCO.
 

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Our local distribution utility in this area of central Florida is Sumter Electric Co-op (SECO Energy). Our membership in co-op gives us flat rate of $.13/Kwh with no time of day or other incentives. This co-op buys their generation and transmission power from Duke Energy. The co-op’s move toward supporting EV customers only includes really reliable service, web site promoting EVs and monthly give-away of level 2 charger to lucky member.
 

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It only matters what your incremental rate is, along with its tax rate (i.e.what your kwh costs you for the Mach-E charging). Anything else relates to what is paid to keep your house electrified.
The supply and delivery costs are charged per Kwh. The only thing that isn’t charged on a per kwh is the $17 connection fee. So all the rest will be for each kWh used while charging the Mach-E. So about $0.14/kWh
 

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Southern California Edison is more expensive than I thought it would be. TOU-Prime plan for EV owners is a base .40 per day + .17 per kWh from 9:01pm - 3:59pm. The higher rate of .44 kWh is 4pm - 9pm and Weekends is .33. I'm currently on a tier 2 plan and pay .27 kWh for 345.6-1382.4 kilowatts. Last month I used 623 kWh.

Their rate comparison tools says I won't save any money switching but that was pre-EV. I am not sure if charging right now will bump me into the higher tier and I'm going to charge as I usually would and see how it goes this month. I have started finding ways to conserve and limiting the EV charging, heater and other big energy users from 4pm - 9pm to see if we can do it.

It is interesting to see how different electric rates are across the County.
 

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I thought of a question that its answer might prove interesting, and perhaps even useful:What are you paying in your area for electricity per kWh? Include all charges reflected on your bill. (Distribution Service, Generation, Transmission, Fuel, Sales & use surcharge, taxes, and anything else you might be charged for on your bill. Also please include your general area in the US. Also, Does your utility offer a discount for EV's

For me in central Va = .13 per kWh
WITH TAXES INCLUDED AT OFF PEAK HOURS IN SOUTHERN PINES NC ~ $ 08 @ kWh
 
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