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As people increasingly move towards EVs and leave ICE cars behind, it's going to make a big impact in reducing fuel consumption globally. I'm curious what the fuel economy of everyone's current cars are right now.
 

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As people increasingly move towards EVs and leave ICE cars behind, it's going to make a big impact in reducing fuel consumption globally. I'm curious what the fuel economy of everyone's current cars are right now.
my 2013 fusion hybrid about 42 mpgs, 2013 c max energi about 81 mpges....of course, during the winter, both go down a little, and in the summer the numbers go up some....
 

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2013 c max energi about 81 mpges.---------how is the HVB capacity? Getting that many mpg could be excess stress (amps) and heat which leads to a degraded HVB capacity which is 5.6 kWh at new. My 2017 has a lifetime average of 47.1 mpg as I drive in EV later for all speeds over 40 mph, up any hills and in the heat. I do not charge it to 100% SOC and during the hot summer months like to keep it between 30-55% SOC to minimize chances of damage. Just sitting in the parking lot during a hot summer will raise the HVB temperature to well over 90F which is not good.
 

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2013 c max energi about 81 mpges.---------how is the HVB capacity? Getting that many mpg could be excess stress (amps) and heat which leads to a degraded HVB capacity which is 5.6 kWh at new. My 2017 has a lifetime average of 47.1 mpg as I drive in EV later for all speeds over 40 mph, up any hills and in the heat. I do not charge it to 100% SOC and during the hot summer months like to keep it between 30-55% SOC to minimize chances of damage. Just sitting in the parking lot during a hot summer will raise the HVB temperature to well over 90F which is not good.
Good morning, just to give you some extra info.....my c max has less than 34,000 miles.....most driving, 90%, at low speeds.....I ,too, drive in EV LATER, for all speeds over 40mph.....I also use EV LATER whenever I have the heater/AC on (that's why I LOVE the heated seats).....in summer I only charge during cooler parts of the day and in winter the warmer part of the day......I use no high speed charging, all from my 120 household line..... I, of course know, that what miles show on the battery is due mostly to how you have been driving, but in warm months I still get 30-33 miles showing on the battery....lately, during winter here in NJ, the battery shows about 25.....with my MPGe around 80, the MPG alone would be 118 approximately.....remember 90% of my driving under 40mph.......where I live most anywhere I need to go is within 10 miles, so all electric most of the time.....
 

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My diesel Grand Cherokee used to get around 22/30, then the EPA got involved and now I'm lucky to get 23 on the highway. Most days I commute in my 2013 Leaf which is listed at 115MPGe
 

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Actually, as electric vehicles, I think people need to get used to thinking in terms of miles/kW-hr vice mpg. For example....Our 2018 Chevy Bolt regularly got 4.5 miles/kW-hr. Our present Nissan Leaf Plus only gets about 3.4 m/kW-hr but it is a much more pleasant ride. I have reserved a Premium with the ER battery so very interested to see what it will get.
 

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As people increasingly move towards EVs and leave ICE cars behind....
There is no way that our electrical systems could handle that. Imagine, as I like to say, every house in your neighborhood running their central air conditioners and electric ovens all night long.
 

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In the summer, six litres per 100 km. In the winter, 10 L/100. (39 mpg and 23.5 mpg)
 

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My 2008 Honda Accord V6 (107K miles) gets about 23-25 mpg highway driving these days.
 

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2018 Ford Fusion Hybrid. Currently at 43.3mpg avg over 18k miles mixed driving.
 

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Our 2017 Chevy Bolt has 65,000 km and gets 15kwh/100km in summer and 20kwh/100km in winter. Range is 380km to 430km with 60kwh full charge in summer. The range has not reduced. At all over. 3 years. Almost all of our charging is at 240 volt. If you use DC fast charge it is only to add 10 to. 20kwh charge once a month on average for longer trips.
I expect our FE MME will not be as efficient but with larger battery capacity we should get 20% more range.
 

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There is no way that our electrical systems could handle that. Imagine, as I like to say, every house in your neighborhood running their central air conditioners and electric ovens all night long.
I disagree.

This 15 page energy.gov analysis goes into the issue in some depth, and is well worth your time. Especially interesting are the expected future demands compared to much higher increases in the past.

An excerpt from the summary sections says this:

"The overall conclusion the analysis in this paper demonstrates is that, based on historical growth rates, sufficient energy generation and generation capacity is expected to be available to support a growing EV fleet as it evolves over time, even with high EV market growth. The analysis also points out that growth in incremental energy generation associated with the future EV market scenarios considered here may reverse the trend over the last 10 years of near-zero growth."
 

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Our 2017 Chevy Bolt has 65,000 km and gets 15kwh/100km in summer and 20kwh/100km in winter. Range is 380km to 430km with 60kwh full charge in summer. The range has not reduced. At all over. 3 years. Almost all of our charging is at 240 volt. If you use DC fast charge it is only to add 10 to. 20kwh charge once a month on average for longer trips.
I expect our FE MME will not be as efficient but with larger battery capacity we should get 20% more range.
So yours reads out kwhr/km? Mine, in the US, is in mi/kwhr. So I get numbers like 2.8 or 3.5 or 4.2.
 

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Yes. In Canada we get the metric equivalent.
I think he was commenting on the efficiency measure.

kWh/100km is used in your market because it is similar to L/100km. So lower is better.

in the US its the opposite. With mi/gal, higher is better. So mi/kWh is a better transition from MPG.

To make things more confusing, the UK/Canadian markets use the imperial gallon (4.54L) which is larger than the US liquid gallon (3.79L). So 40 MPG in the UK is about 33 MPG here in the US. Going to electricity will help simplify things a bit. miles, km, and kW are the standardized units of measure no matter the country.

I feel the mi(km)/kWh may be the easiest measurement to use. If your car is rated at 3.6 mi (5.8 km)/kWh, and you need to drive 18 miles(29 km), you can quickly calculate the amount of energy you need. Round up your numbers for easy math. (18 mi/4 mi, or 29 km/6 km equals about 5 kWh needed).
 

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My gas guzzler Durango R/T gets ~16MPG around town, 23MPG+ on the highway. Surprisingly good with cylinder deactivation on the highway. Took it out to the MidWest and got close to 26MPG on those flat interstates doing 70MPH+.

My Wife's Subaru Outback which the MME will be replacing gets ~22MPG around town, worse than the rating. Love her to death but she's one of those "light turned red but the foot's on the throttle until I need to stop" drivers.

That all said, this is the wrong question. It's not so much the fuel economy vs the carbon footprint.

When we bought our home, we made a conscious decision to purchase a smaller and older house with less amenities to be in town rather than out in the country. Both our commutes (when we were commuting) are less than 4 miles one way.

I buy LOT of items used (especially tools and equipment) and I repair + extend the life of the stuff I have. Stuff that most people would throw away. I also limit food and other waste as much as possible.

So maybe it's an excuse so I don't feel too badly about the Durango but in the 3~1/2 years I've owned that car I put less than 15K miles on it. 8 mile commute 4x/week and a few road trips just don't amount to much.

Net... in our situation, I doubt that the MME will dramatically reduce our carbon footprint.
 

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My gas guzzler Durango R/T gets ~16MPG around town, 23MPG+ on the highway. Surprisingly good with cylinder deactivation on the highway. Took it out to the MidWest and got close to 26MPG on those flat interstates doing 70MPH+.

My Wife's Subaru Outback which the MME will be replacing gets ~22MPG around town, worse than the rating. Love her to death but she's one of those "light turned red but the foot's on the throttle until I need to stop" drivers.

That all said, this is the wrong question. It's not so much the fuel economy vs the carbon footprint.

When we bought our home, we made a conscious decision to purchase a smaller and older house with less amenities to be in town rather than out in the country. Both our commutes (when we were commuting) are less than 4 miles one way.

I buy LOT of items used (especially tools and equipment) and I repair + extend the life of the stuff I have. Stuff that most people would throw away. I also limit food and other waste as much as possible.

So maybe it's an excuse so I don't feel too badly about the Durango but in the 3~1/2 years I've owned that car I put less than 15K miles on it. 8 mile commute 4x/week and a few road trips just don't amount to much.

Net... in our situation, I doubt that the MME will dramatically reduce our carbon footprint.
Wow, if you got the extended battery, you will be charging once a month.
 
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